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  1. #151
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    Re: Will my python ever recover?

    I think it might be a lack of exercise and/or depression. She doesn't seem happy in her enclosure but seems to be happy when free roaming my room. I think she will be okay with more consistent interaction and exercise.

    Now I have to decide between a dog or a python. I can't properly care for both at the same time.

    I recently lost my dog and have a deposit down for a pup. Tough decision.

    Sent from my SM-S911U using Tapatalk

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  3. #152
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    I'm sorry for the loss of your dog- that's rough. I've always had dogs, & many snakes, but none the size of yours that wants to roam free. Your call, certainly. Some snakes do better than others in captivity, but they certainly didn't evolve to live in a cage, so it should be no surprise that not all of them adjust well to it. I used to keep bull & gopher snakes, & they're not too happy in captivity either- even when they're c/b- because they're very active hunters in the wild.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  5. #153
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    Re: Will my python ever recover?

    Thank you, it has to be one of the toughest things to go through.

    If she isn't sick in anyway and it's not the antibiotics, then lack of exercise and/or depression. That is what must be causing the poor body condition and impaction.

    I will continue taking her out every night or every other night and interacting with. Let her cruise around the room and get some exercise. I will also try to really spice up her enclosure.

    Although, I may have to decide between a dog or a python. Otherwise, I think there will be some neglect. Spending enough time with them separately is kind of unrealistic for someone like me, who works a full-time job. I wish the three of us could hangout together and watch tv.

    Thanks everyone, keep you posted...

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  7. #154
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    I love cuddling with my dogs on our shared couch, & I also enjoy handling/cuddling some snakes while watching movies, but it's a very bad idea to mix all three.

    Snakes are wild animals still, no matter how calm they become with us, & they rely on their instincts. We don't always know what triggers an accident, but by then it's too late.

    So while I'm sure that photo of your late dog with your large snake is a fond memory for you, honestly, it gives a horribly-bad impression for others who may try to copy it. I would NEVER want my dogs injured by a snake, nor my snakes injured by my dogs- and honestly, you're just one "startle" away from disaster there. Just imagine those long snake teeth embedded in your sweet dog's soft nose...

    I've kept many snakes for literally decades- I know how calm they are with me, & I do teach my dogs (who have some natural curiosity) that they're "mine" & nothing to get excited (either way) about. To teach my dogs about snakes, I've allowed them to sniff a tail end (when everyone's calm & well-controlled) or their shed skins, but NEVER with a lack of restraint or with their faces within reach. Accidents are hard to foresee until they happen. Please always put safety first when it comes to your pets. Big snakes & big dogs both have enough bad press already- please do not add "ammunition" to people's fears & hatred. Snakes as large as yours are very capable of doing you or your other pets harm- don't think for a moment it can't happen to you.

    As far as your snake's health: lean is thought to be healthier in the long run for animals as well as people. Not every snake or human or other creature has the exact same metabolism, nor the same ideal physique, & since you & your vets have ruled out possible issues, & since her sheen comes thru handsomely in your photos, I still say she's healthy & gives every indication of being just fine. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" & judging from your choice of canine, I'd say you subconsciously prefer animals that are more robust, so to you, this snake appears too lean.


    Personally, I prefer the appearance of dogs with a leaner build- like the sight hounds (Pharoah hounds, Greyhounds, Whippets, etc) & Dobermans, & I've owned at least 4 such dogs. But to me, the most important thing about any dog, or any pet for that matter, is their personality AND keeping them in the best health & condition they can be. I've had a number of dogs in my life, & all came from shelters (except one that would have been dumped there had I not accepted her first). They came to me with imperfections- that's life- & all became to be the best version of themselves- something that I'm very proud of.

    I've never once started with a puppy- instead I've always chosen those hard to adopt adult dogs- the ones whose chances in life were running out. My most recent canine adoption (in January of this year) was an elderly (12 years?) chubby Chihuahua whose owners had passed away. I never even saw her photo on the shelter's website- it hadn't been posted yet- but I raced down to meet & likely adopt her regardless, because I felt she'd be a great fit with both me & my other dog, an elderly male. I was right- they're hilarious together and with me- she's very playful, & has been an awesome addition to my life. Her previous owners over-fed her, but they loved her, & while she'll never be svelte, I love her for the intelligent & amazing companion that she is. With a controlled diet & more exercise now for her health, of course. I never even fancied myself a Chihuahua owner- I've seen some fairly obnoxious ones that were allowed, even encouraged, to be yappy- but I was greatly rewarded for keeping an open mind. She's nothing like that at all- she's a delight.

    By the way, since you work full-time, how are you going to manage a puppy? They don't teach themselves- they need company & lots of guidance. That's one reason I always got adult dogs- I too was working full-time. Puppies left alone get in trouble- they learn bad destructive things instead of the right things unless you're around to show them. They get LONELY. My other dog, now age 17 years (!) was a mess when I got him at age 6. He changed owners several times, each one dumping him back in the shelter after his "separation anxiety" caused him to destroy things & whine all day. I had another dog at the time I brought him home, & together we cured his separation anxiety. He still doesn't really know how to play with others- he was alone so much that he learned to throw his own toys, then chase after them. But now he's caught on how to play with my other "new" dog, & he hardly cares about dog toys now. She really gets him going, & they keep me laughing. Just remember that any pet you choose has their own needs- it's not all about yours.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  9. #155
    BPnet Veteran Caitlin's Avatar
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    Re: Will my python ever recover?

    Much love to you for working so hard to try to ensure that your snake is healthy and happy.

    I have another suggestion for you if you are open to it since you've narrowed down possibilities for her issues as being potentially behavior/exercise-related. I am friends with Lori Torrini, a behaviorist and trainer who works with a large group of snakes. She and her husband also run an animal sanctuary on their Colorado ranch. It's her veterinarian, by the way, that I would have referred you to if you felt you wanted a veterinary consult.

    Lori's focus is on helping keepers learn about how best to respond to their snakes' behaviors and provide an enriched environment and behavioral choice leading to increased quality of life. She won't give medical advice but works very closely with her veterinarian, who is outstanding.

    Lori has a few decades of experience with behavior and training of multiple species from pets to zoo animals, and is a very kind person to deal with. I'd really encourage you to consider some phone consultations with her; she will also work with you and your snake on video if you like. She'd provide a great home for your snake should you decide to surrender her, but honestly I'd rather see you able to resolve these issues and keep her (if that is your preference). Let me know if you are interested and I'll put you in touch with Lori. If you want to get a feel for how she works and how she interacts with her snakes, she has a YouTube channel that you can search for just using her name.

    You may be right that you need to ultimately make a choice between dog and snake, but I am not entirely convinced of that. It's very possible to provide a lot of enrichment to snakes without necessarily spending a lot of time doing it.
    1.0 Jungle Carpet Python 'Ziggy'
    1.0 Bredl's Python 'Calcifer'
    0.1 Brazilian Rainbow Boa 'Mara'
    1.1 Tarahumara Mountain Boas 'Paco' and 'Frida'
    2.0 Dumeril's Boas 'Gyre' and 'Titan'
    1.0 Stimson's Python 'Jake'
    1.1 Children's Pythons 'Miso' and 'Ozzy'
    1.0 Anthill Python 'Cricket'
    1.0 Plains Hognose 'Peanut'
    1.1 Rough-scaled Sand Boas 'Rassi' and 'Kala'
    1.0 Ball Python (BEL) 'Sugar'
    1.0 Gray-banded Kingsnake 'Nacho'
    1.0 Green Tree Python (Aru) 'Jade'

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  11. #156
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    Hey... I was doing a search for another thread and this one popped up in my results. How is your python doing?

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