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  1. #1
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Speaking of target training...

    I thought you all might enjoy watching this:Endangered Cuban Crocodile Training Session!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFbPBX0T2SE
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    Homebody (11-20-2022)

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    BPnet Veteran Homebody's Avatar
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    Re: Speaking of target training...

    This does a great job showing the value of target training when dealing with reptiles that are potentially dangerous. Rhom isn't proficient yet, but I'm sure he will be by the time he gets big. For an example of a reptile that is proficient see Merlin in this video.

    Also. What...a...beautiful...animal! Oh...my...God!
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  5. #3
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Speaking of target training...

    Quote Originally Posted by Homebody View Post
    This does a great job showing the value of target training when dealing with reptiles that are potentially dangerous....

    Also. What...a...beautiful...animal! Oh...my...God!
    I thought so too- glad you liked it.

    It also illustrates how "zoo-keeping" methods have significantly changed over the years.

    Zoos originally kept animals "feral" with as little human interaction as possible, saying such interaction wasn't natural. The animals were just something to be looked at, as curiosities, in all their glorious ferocity. Vintage books about keeping snakes promoted the same "hands-off" mentality.

    But it's also not natural for wild animals to be contained so near humans & living in fear either, plus routine veterinary care was far more stressful for the animals (to the serious detriment of their health) & preventive care was far less likely to be done because of what it put the animals (not to mention their keepers) through.

    Now the thinking is that both staff & animals are far better off when animals can cooperate with their care by going into shift cages or opening their mouths as needed. It's truly wonderful to see the updated methods used for all kinds of animals- even reptiles. Better methods also makes for less boredom for confined animals, providing enhancements & things to do, because they're easier to manage.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    Animallover3541 (11-22-2022),bcr229 (11-20-2022),dakski (11-21-2022),Homebody (11-20-2022)

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