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Thread: Bunny Question

  1. #11
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by MR Snakes View Post
    OK, just checked. It's 59 in said room. Is that moving in the right direction?
    Only for rabbits & Eskimos...

  2. #12
    Registered User MR Snakes's Avatar
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    Only for rabbits & Eskimos...
    Hey, it's still 27 degrees above freezing in there!

  3. #13
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by MR Snakes View Post
    Hey, it's still 27 degrees above freezing in there!
    But you were asking about keeping snakes, no? Not recommended...seriously.

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    MR Snakes (12-30-2018)

  5. #14
    Registered User MR Snakes's Avatar
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    But you were asking about keeping snakes, no? Not recommended...seriously.
    Future sneks will be in racks/tubs and the room will be 70-75. I'm guessing it will be easier to keep tubs warm in a rack instead of cages.

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    Registered User Dianne's Avatar
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by MR Snakes View Post
    Future sneks will be in racks/tubs and the room will be 70-75. I'm guessing it will be easier to keep tubs warm in a rack instead of cages.
    If your only heat source will be heat mats/tape, you’ll want to keep the room at least 75F unless everything is well insulated, in my opinion anyway. If you use cages with radiant heat panels, you can better get away with room temperatures down to 70F. On really cold nights (low teens to 20’s), my snake room will drop to 70-72F but the panels keep the hot spot at 88-90F and keep the ambient temps on the cool end 78-80F. The panels run longer and more frequently when the temperatures are lower (on/off thermostat), but do a good job of maintaining temperatures.
    Other Snakes:
    Hudson 1988 1.0 Colombian rainbow; Yang 2002 1.0 Corn snake; Merlin 2000 1.0 Solomon Island ground boa; Kett 2015 1.0 Diamond Jungle Jaguar carpet python; Dakota 2014 0.0.1 Children’s python

    Ball pythons:
    Eli 1990 1.0 Normal; Buttercup 2015 1.0 Albino; Artemis 2015 0.1 Dragonfly; Orion 2015 1.0 Banana Pinstripe; Button 2018 1.0 Blue Eyed Lucy; Piper 2018 0.1 Piebald; Belle 2018 0.1 Lemonblast; Sabrina 2017 0.1 Mojave; Selene 2017 0.1 Banana Mojave; Loki 2018 1.0 Pastel Mystic Potion; Cuervo 2018 1.0 Banana Piebald; Claude 2017 1.0 Albino Pastel Spider; Penelope 2016 0.1 Lesser

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  8. #16
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by MR Snakes View Post
    So you have seen my thread/rant about my daughter's upcoming bunny acquisition. Santa has also arranged to have it at a nearby bunny rescue, how nice! Anywho, It will be housebroken and free range (in our house) but sleep at night in it's cage at the foot of my daughter's bed. At what temperature should her room or cage be at night? We keep the kids rooms between 62-65. Does the bunny need supplemental heat? Any other advice is welcome. We have had rabbits before (Rabi Foo Foo) but it has been a few years and I was not that involved but am in the middle of it now. Thanks
    Who cares! You're going to feed the bunny to your snake one day
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  9. #17
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by RickyNY View Post
    Who cares! You're going to feed the bunny to your snake one day
    Good thing my daughter doesn't read this!

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    Bunnies are NOT as resilient as people like to think.

    They do better in the cold than heat. They can do fine without heat at 50F. There should be NO drafts in the room. Supplemental heat can be some blankets of it won't chew them or small animal heat pads. They don't do well 80F and up. Either provide a fan in the summer or keep it in a cooler room.

    That hutch is way too small for bunnies unless it is use for a few hours a day. They usually spend the night foraging so while your daughter sleeps, it will need space to move. A minimum of space should be something that allows the bunny to hop 3 times its length, stand on its hind legs, and no bars for flooring as that can cause hock sores which are painful to your bunny. I use Wabbitat plus the extension which provide about 5-6 foot long of space, plus a puppy play pen, for my 3 lb bunny. This space is necessary as they need to exercise and move in order for their guts to function properly.

    Bunnies are closely related to deer. They are grass eaters and their sensitive gut rely heavily on the diet provided. So hay is a must and it is to be provided 24/7. Do not feed alfalfa for adults. Do not use those yogurt drops treats from pet stores. Bunnies can survive strictly on hay. Pellets can be supplemented in very small amounts, no more than a few teaspoons a day. I recommend Oxbow for pellets due to its high fiber content. Veggies should be no more than the size of its head per day, and fruits given very sparingly or in small amounts or not at all.

    Bunnies can do a lot of damage in less than 5 minutes, including but not limited to, chewing threw wires of all kinds, walls and carpets. I left my vacuum cleaner in my bunny's play pen for 3 min. I turn around to find its wire chewed half way through. Bunny proof your home prior to bringing it home.

    Litterbox train from day one. It is optional but recommended for easy cleaning. Place it where it starts to pee then move it slowly by inches to your desired location. Use paper bedding or paper pellets. Pine pellets are okay but can be messy. Place hay on one side of the box.

    Do not pick up your bunny unless 1. You know how to restrain it from hurting itself 2. You have to move the bunny 3. You earn its trust. Bunnies in general do not like being picked up. If picked up wrong, they can kick so hard to break its spine.

    Find an exotic bunny vet near you now for when you need one. Like I mentioned, it is important to maintain good gut flora. If not, your bunny can become very sick with what we call 'poopy butt', which is fatal and can kill your bunny within 24 hours if no emergency care is given.

    There is a reason why bunnies are #3 most surrendered pet in the US. People underestimate their
    Last edited by Cheesenugget; 12-31-2018 at 09:38 AM.

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    Updated post - sorry for duplicate posts. My phone glitched

    Bunnies are NOT as resilient as people like to think.

    They do better in the cold than heat. They can do fine without heat at 50F. There should be NO drafts in the room. Supplemental heat can be some blankets of it won't chew them or small animal heat pads. They don't do well 80F and up. Either provide a fan in the summer or keep it in a cooler room.

    That hutch is way too small for bunnies unless it is use for a few hours a day. They usually spend the night foraging so while your daughter sleeps, it will need space to move. A minimum of space should be something that allows the bunny to hop 3 times its length, stand on its hind legs, and no bars for flooring as that can cause hock sores which are painful to your bunny. I use Wabbitat plus the extension which provide about 5-6 foot long of space, plus a puppy play pen, for my 3 lb bunny. This space is necessary as they need to exercise and move in order for their guts to function properly.

    Bunnies are closely related to deer. They are grass eaters and their sensitive gut rely heavily on the diet provided. So hay is a must and it is to be provided 24/7. Do not feed alfalfa for adults. Do not use those yogurt drops treats from pet stores. Bunnies can survive strictly on hay. Pellets can be supplemented in very small amounts, no more than a few teaspoons a day. I recommend Oxbow for pellets due to its high fiber content. Veggies should be no more than the size of its head per day, and fruits given very sparingly or in small amounts or not at all.

    Bunnies can do a lot of damage in less than 5 minutes, including but not limited to, chewing threw wires of all kinds, walls and carpets. I left my vacuum cleaner in my bunny's play pen for 3 min. I turn around to find its wire chewed half way through. Bunny proof your home prior to bringing it home.

    Litterbox train from day one. It is optional but recommended for easy cleaning. Place it where it starts to pee then move it slowly by inches to your desired location. Use paper bedding or paper pellets. Pine pellets are okay but can be messy. Place hay on one side of the box.

    Do not pick up your bunny unless 1. You know how to restrain it from hurting itself 2. You have to move the bunny 3. You earn its trust. Bunnies in general do not like being picked up. If picked up wrong, they can kick so hard to break its spine.

    Find an exotic bunny vet near you now for when you need one. Like I mentioned, it is important to maintain good gut flora. If not, your bunny can become very sick with what we call 'poopy butt', which is fatal and can kill your bunny within 24 hours if no emergency care is given.

    A bad diet, lack of exercise and stress can disturb its gut, thus kill your bunny. Your bunny will hide its symptoms until it can't anymore, that is when emergency intervention is needed. Your bunny must eat all the time and poop all the time in a good, solid dry poop. Its poop should not be mushy, watery or smelly. Bunnies don't have diarrhea like dogs and cats do. That is an emergency condition and needs care asap. That is why fiber like hay must be provided at all times. Hay also helps keep its teeth trimmed. You can provide wooden toys made for small animals and apple sticks (a favorite) as snacks and something to chew on.

    There is a reason why bunnies are #3 most surrendered pet in the US. People underestimate their level of care as easy. They are not beginner's pets and not meant for small children due to its delicate bone structure and easy tendency to be stressed out. An ideal home is one where it is quiet, with teen or older children, lots of space to roam even in a play pen and attention to detail for any signs of 'abnormal' behavior like not eating or pooping the right size, shape or amount.

    Besides its health I must stress that bunnies do bite and they bite HARD. Unlike dogs that have been domesticated and trained with bite inhibition, bunnies do not care about that and will with very little warning, charge and bite through skin. Some bunnies, especially dwarves, are known to be aggressive due to lack of socialization and trust of people when younger (like mine). Small children may misunderstand and not give it space thus pushing the bunny to bite. Some are very territorial and may bite (like mine).

    Lastly, please adopt a bonded pair if possible. They should be fixed by the rescue prior to adoption. Bunnies do better mentally and physically when kept together. They recover better from illnesses too. They can bond with its human though it takes a little longer.

    If you can handle such commitments, good luck!

  13. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Cheesenugget For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (01-03-2019),GoingPostal (01-04-2019),mlededee (01-01-2019),MR Snakes (12-31-2018)

  14. #20
    Registered User MR Snakes's Avatar
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    Re: Bunny Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheesenugget View Post
    Updated post - sorry for duplicate posts. My phone glitched

    Bunnies are NOT as resilient as people like to think.

    They do better in the cold than heat. They can do fine without heat at 50F. There should be NO drafts in the room. Supplemental heat can be some blankets of it won't chew them or small animal heat pads. They don't do well 80F and up. Either provide a fan in the summer or keep it in a cooler room.

    That hutch is way too small for bunnies unless it is use for a few hours a day. They usually spend the night foraging so while your daughter sleeps, it will need space to move. A minimum of space should be something that allows the bunny to hop 3 times its length, stand on its hind legs, and no bars for flooring as that can cause hock sores which are painful to your bunny. I use Wabbitat plus the extension which provide about 5-6 foot long of space, plus a puppy play pen, for my 3 lb bunny. This space is necessary as they need to exercise and move in order for their guts to function properly.

    Bunnies are closely related to deer. They are grass eaters and their sensitive gut rely heavily on the diet provided. So hay is a must and it is to be provided 24/7. Do not feed alfalfa for adults. Do not use those yogurt drops treats from pet stores. Bunnies can survive strictly on hay. Pellets can be supplemented in very small amounts, no more than a few teaspoons a day. I recommend Oxbow for pellets due to its high fiber content. Veggies should be no more than the size of its head per day, and fruits given very sparingly or in small amounts or not at all.

    Bunnies can do a lot of damage in less than 5 minutes, including but not limited to, chewing threw wires of all kinds, walls and carpets. I left my vacuum cleaner in my bunny's play pen for 3 min. I turn around to find its wire chewed half way through. Bunny proof your home prior to bringing it home.

    Litterbox train from day one. It is optional but recommended for easy cleaning. Place it where it starts to pee then move it slowly by inches to your desired location. Use paper bedding or paper pellets. Pine pellets are okay but can be messy. Place hay on one side of the box.

    Do not pick up your bunny unless 1. You know how to restrain it from hurting itself 2. You have to move the bunny 3. You earn its trust. Bunnies in general do not like being picked up. If picked up wrong, they can kick so hard to break its spine.

    Find an exotic bunny vet near you now for when you need one. Like I mentioned, it is important to maintain good gut flora. If not, your bunny can become very sick with what we call 'poopy butt', which is fatal and can kill your bunny within 24 hours if no emergency care is given.

    A bad diet, lack of exercise and stress can disturb its gut, thus kill your bunny. Your bunny will hide its symptoms until it can't anymore, that is when emergency intervention is needed. Your bunny must eat all the time and poop all the time in a good, solid dry poop. Its poop should not be mushy, watery or smelly. Bunnies don't have diarrhea like dogs and cats do. That is an emergency condition and needs care asap. That is why fiber like hay must be provided at all times. Hay also helps keep its teeth trimmed. You can provide wooden toys made for small animals and apple sticks (a favorite) as snacks and something to chew on.

    There is a reason why bunnies are #3 most surrendered pet in the US. People underestimate their level of care as easy. They are not beginner's pets and not meant for small children due to its delicate bone structure and easy tendency to be stressed out. An ideal home is one where it is quiet, with teen or older children, lots of space to roam even in a play pen and attention to detail for any signs of 'abnormal' behavior like not eating or pooping the right size, shape or amount.

    Besides its health I must stress that bunnies do bite and they bite HARD. Unlike dogs that have been domesticated and trained with bite inhibition, bunnies do not care about that and will with very little warning, charge and bite through skin. Some bunnies, especially dwarves, are known to be aggressive due to lack of socialization and trust of people when younger (like mine). Small children may misunderstand and not give it space thus pushing the bunny to bite. Some are very territorial and may bite (like mine).

    Lastly, please adopt a bonded pair if possible. They should be fixed by the rescue prior to adoption. Bunnies do better mentally and physically when kept together. They recover better from illnesses too. They can bond with its human though it takes a little longer.

    If you can handle such commitments, good luck!
    Wow, nice post. I will have my wife and daughter read and heed. Thanks

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