Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 1,395

1 members and 1,394 guests
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 04:30 AM.

» Today's Birthdays

Kelina (39)

» Stats

Members: 75,270
Threads: 248,664
Posts: 2,569,519
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, Sneebsnop
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-16-2021
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 8 Times in 4 Posts

    Feeding response

    Hi! So my corn just tried to eat my hand when I went to fix a few decorations he had messed up. At first, he was curious and came to bump my knuckles but then bit me and wrapped around my hand. I tried to gently get him off for like 10 minutes as he tried to keep eating it. Then he bit my sleeve, let go, and tried to pull my sleeve to his hide but ultimately let it go.

    Is this cause for concern? I feed him regularly so he cant be that hungry. He's the type to eat anything anytime though. He isn't aggressive or stressed.

    Could this just be his normal feeding response? He does associate my smell with food, and has bit me before but never trying to strangle. Also, could his teeth be damaged from the pulling? I haven't handled him for a while time, so maybe that could be part of it? Please let me know

  2. #2
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    20,423
    Thanks
    28,448
    Thanked 20,048 Times in 11,975 Posts
    It sounds like a combination of things.

    -He hasn't been handled enough yet to know you, your touch & your scent. How long have you had him? How old is he- how big? (length)

    -Can you post pics so we can see his body condition? Every now & then a well-meaning owner is way underfeeding their snake- I'd like to rule that out. How often is he fed, & what is he fed? Size & type. Some snakes may have a bigger feeding response than others- much like us. But remember that snakes are growing & NEED food...I've seen ppl feed pinkie mice to snakes that are 6-12 months old- vastly underfeeding them- I hope that's not the case here.

    -Any chance you have some other enticing accidental odors on you? Like from handling prey or other pets? You might try rubbing a little rubbing alcohol on your hands next time you handle- that very likely to be a quick turn-off. (You don't want to be dripping with it, just enough to smell like alcohol.)

    -If that was my snake, I'd want to cure this issue while he's smaller (-I'm assuming this isn't an adult snake?) for obvious reasons. Yes, jerking your hand or sleeve away can easily damage his teeth- it can pull them out, even hurt his mouth. Try not to jerk away (I know, easier said than done).

    -If all you ever do is feed this snake, he has naturally came to expect that anything coming his way is edible. Socialize him more. Communicate better as to what's coming his way.

    -I've been a rat-snake keeper (& many snakes) for many years. I find they're generally smart enough to get my scent & know I'm not incoming food, by blowing air across my hand thru the screen (watch for their tongue flicking & recognition) before I just reach in. If you suddenly just reach in to adjust something, they don't have time to identify you- they just go for motion- & it's your fault. So be considerate- "announce yourself" first.

    If they still seem ready to bite, it hurts nothing & generally "changes the channel" if you give them a light spray of cool water in the face- keep a little spray bottle handy. No, it's not mean...wild snakes drink the rain, & pet snakes can drink from spray or a water trickle. But it changes their train of thought pretty well. Instead of sticking your hand in first, you can also offer an empty sleeve with your scent on it.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 07-09-2024 at 05:35 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Malum Argenteum (07-09-2024)

  4. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-16-2021
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 8 Times in 4 Posts

    Re: Feeding response

    He just turned 3, and I've had him from a hatchling from around 1-2 months old. He is around 140-45 cm, haven't measured since his last shed. I used to handle him a lot more when he smaller, but now due to work/school and life in general sometimes he can go weeks without being handled. I do still clean/change his water etc. so im sure he's accustomed to my scent and me in general. I'll take some pics during the morning, but I feed him adult mice ~30 grams every 12-14 days.

    I usually wash my hands before doing anything but now I didn't, since I just thought I'll quickly fix the leaves.

    He's really sweet and curious, and has never shown defensive behaviour or aggression towards me (except the time earlier this year around march, when he nicked me). Now that I really think, I think its just that I don't communicate to him clearly the things I'm going to do, I just always announce im there so he isn't startled and open his viv. (I tried to insert a pic of his food, but I don't know how to use this sry)

  5. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-16-2021
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 8 Times in 4 Posts

    Re: Feeding response

    Oh and how do I go about checking his teeth? I didn't pull back but I didn't let my sleeve be dragged either. Afterwards he seemed just fine, but just in hunting mode.

  6. #5
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    20,423
    Thanks
    28,448
    Thanked 20,048 Times in 11,975 Posts
    You might also try feeding him a little sooner- most adult colubrids (& 3 years is a "young" adult- still growing) should eat every 10 days. He's obviously hungry.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 07-09-2024 at 06:03 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Malum Argenteum (07-09-2024)

  8. #6
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    20,423
    Thanks
    28,448
    Thanked 20,048 Times in 11,975 Posts

    Re: Feeding response

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathalie View Post
    Oh and how do I go about checking his teeth? I didn't pull back but I didn't let my sleeve be dragged either. Afterwards he seemed just fine, but just in hunting mode.

    "You" probably don't, lol. Take pics if you try... (jkg) It's not easy to check their teeth- easier to watch for symptoms, & also look fast when they yawn. To deliberately open their mouth with a tongue depressor (sideways) or something similar is awkward & could do more harm than help anyway. Sometimes a tooth will come loose & stick out the side of their mouth or cause other problems, but that should be fairly obvious.

    One other thing to remember- snakes see our motion but don't accurately recognize us just visually. They NEED our scent, or touch in some cases (depending on the type of snake & individual personality) to identify us. Seeing us approach just begs the question for them: food? or predator? They're not wired to be "pets", & they're independent...they're not thinking "buddy". They rely on instincts to survive- so that means constantly thinking "food or danger"". It's up to us to show them we're neither one. They're interested in being well-fed, and in feeling safe. We can do both, & should.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 07-09-2024 at 06:14 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  9. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    mistergreen (07-10-2024),Nathalie (07-09-2024),SnakeMother22 (07-11-2024)

  10. #7
    BPnet Lifer EL-Ziggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-05-2014
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    4,208
    Thanks
    5,055
    Thanked 5,510 Times in 2,696 Posts

    Re: Feeding response

    I agree that he could probably wants more food. A 30g mouse is pretty small for an adult corn. Id try larger prey like jumbo mice or small rats. Do you use a snake hook when you want to handle him? Most of my snakes have very strong feeding responses. A soft tap with the hook will instantly shut that off. Theyre very manageable afterwards.
    3.0 Carpet Pythons, 1.1 Bullsnakes
    1.0 Olive Python 1.0 Scrub Python,
    1.0 BI, 0.1 BCO

  11. #8
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    20,423
    Thanks
    28,448
    Thanked 20,048 Times in 11,975 Posts

    Re: Feeding response

    Quote Originally Posted by EL-Ziggy View Post
    I agree that he could probably wants more food. A 30g mouse is pretty small for an adult corn. Id try larger prey like jumbo mice or small rats....
    Personally I'd avoid feeding jumbo mice, at least on a regular basis- those are old retired breeders & are high fat. Some snakes may even have trouble digesting them, but in any case, regular consumption will pack on excess weight that's not healthy for the snake. Ever hear of fatty liver disease?
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Armiyana (Yesterday)

  13. #9
    BPnet Royalty dakski's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-08-2014
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,821
    Thanks
    8,149
    Thanked 9,751 Times in 3,882 Posts
    Images: 134

    Re: Feeding response

    Hook/Tap training can be helpful, but with a corn, you should be careful as they are not a big snake. My scaleless corn, Solana, has laid eggs several times and also had a few episodes of being scared. Even though she isn't hook/tap trained, she responds well to the hook. It breaks the cycle so to speak and she realizes I am not there to hurt her. The key is I use the hook to gently nudge her. I do not tap like I do with my bigger snakes as I do not want to hurt her. I just want her to know I am there.

    The bigger snakes I have (Boas and a Carpet Python) are hook trained. When I go in, I use the hook to gently let them know I am there and it is not food time. Works amazingly well. Could work well with a corn.

    Regarding food. I feed my adult corns (male - Figment and female - Solana) adult mice. 20-30G. Nothing bigger. I feed every two weeks and I occasionally I'll feed a week later (3 feedings in a 4 week period). I would not go bigger than an adult mouse. As Boger said, they are too fatty. Once a snake is overweight, it takes forever to come off and they never really lose the fat component of the weight gain.

    I would try hook training and I would feed every 10 days, but not more than adult mouse. Alternatively, feed every 14, 7, and 14 days. Mix it up.

    Good luck and keep us posted.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to dakski For This Useful Post:

    Homebody (Yesterday)

  15. #10
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    20,423
    Thanks
    28,448
    Thanked 20,048 Times in 11,975 Posts
    I'll add my perspective: I know that "tap training" with a snake hook seems to work for many keepers, but personally, I've had very enthusiastic snakes wrap & bite onto the hook (hard metal!) & I prefer they don't injure their mouths, especially when there's a safer way to accomplish the same things.

    I keep handy a spray bottle with cool water- a spritz to their face is just like rain...in fact many will drink from it too, as they would in nature, but the point is, it "changes the channel" just as effectively & for the same reason as a snake hook, only it's much safer. The tap training method is more appropriate to those keeping the large & giant snakes, where a water spray won't be effective at the distance needed for personal safety. You can also spray thru the screen before you open an enclosure for an excitable snake- something you can't do with a hook.

    I tend to combine methods- I give snakes my scent first- if they're still too "excited", a spray or several with water is generally effective & without harm. You can also use things other than a metal snake hook for "tapping" a snake- a cardboard roll from gift wrap, for example, if it's the right length.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; Yesterday at 09:03 AM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Armiyana (Yesterday),Homebody (Yesterday)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1