Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 331

0 members and 331 guests
No Members online
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 04:30 AM.

» Today's Birthdays

None

» Stats

Members: 73,584
Threads: 247,567
Posts: 2,561,898
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, ballpython1223
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Registered User YungRasputin's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-03-2022
    Location
    Appalachia
    Posts
    298
    Thanks
    155
    Thanked 286 Times in 157 Posts
    Images: 21
    i also think bioactive experiments in my experience are v much a “aim for the moon” sort of endeavor where if your aim is the moon, even if you fail, you’ll still be half way (probably butchered that phrase but you guys get it tho lol)
    het for nothing but groovy

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to YungRasputin For This Useful Post:

    JJpeep (01-23-2023)

  3. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-11-2021
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    192
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 125 Times in 67 Posts
    Images: 36

    Re: Question about spotted python enclosure

    That makes a lot of sense. I have just read on a few threads that people don't recommend bioactive for BPs. I definitely am not an expert on this topic. So the more information I end up hearing the better for my decision. I have seen Kaufman's BP doc and I really enjoyed watching how they life in the wild. It was really interesting and you are right. No foliage near the opening of the 'dens'.

  4. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-11-2021
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    192
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 125 Times in 67 Posts
    Images: 36

    Re: Question about spotted python enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by YungRasputin View Post
    (i actually have some mosses that work really well simulating deserty grass patches)
    Can you share which mosses you use? Do you attach them to rocks? Or put them on substrate?

  5. #14
    Registered User YungRasputin's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-03-2022
    Location
    Appalachia
    Posts
    298
    Thanks
    155
    Thanked 286 Times in 157 Posts
    Images: 21

    Re: Question about spotted python enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by JJpeep View Post
    That makes a lot of sense. I have just read on a few threads that people don't recommend bioactive for BPs. I definitely am not an expert on this topic. So the more information I end up hearing the better for my decision. I have seen Kaufman's BP doc and I really enjoyed watching how they life in the wild. It was really interesting and you are right. No foliage near the opening of the 'dens'.
    i think i’ll check those threads out to see what peeps were saying but i think as our collective knowledge of animal husbandry continues to evolve and develop - we can progress past these aforementioned issues and failures - a good example in my mind is the tragic case of “SADS” (“Sudden Avic Death Syndrome” - which is not an actual biological affliction) in which Avicularia avicularia tarantulas where at the time, a new species coming up in the hobby and the prevailing recommendations for care was massive amounts of humidity, severely decreased ventilation, etc - effectively people created swamp boxes which killed both plants and the Avics - what we now know is that Avics are an obligate arboreal species spending their entire lives on the trees, where it is drier, has crosswinds, etc which in turn has produced cross ventilation systems in enclosures, greatly reduced soil moisture, etc - leading to easy keeping and thriving of spiders and plants alike

    this to me illustrates that if we focus less on what we want the tank to look like aesthetically or take a superificial look at its natural environment and instead focus more on the micro-climate of the niche areas these animals live in - it makes these projects much easier and more successful
    het for nothing but groovy

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to YungRasputin For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (01-23-2023)

  7. #15
    Registered User YungRasputin's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-03-2022
    Location
    Appalachia
    Posts
    298
    Thanks
    155
    Thanked 286 Times in 157 Posts
    Images: 21

    Re: Question about spotted python enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by JJpeep View Post
    Can you share which mosses you use? Do you attach them to rocks? Or put them on substrate?
    sheet moss for green patches - reindeer moss and blonde sphagnum moss can also do well and provide a v deserty effect - they’re good for maintaining humidity levels while also leaving the tank dryish - they’re easily revived if completely dried out - for out and out desert enclosures reindeer moss is good because not only does it resemble tumbleweeds but it can help you raise humidity levels at night time like what occurs in the wild - for the sheet moss i usually rip it a bit and really dig it in there and play with it until it looks like naturally occurring “grass” going back and forth between covering some of it with soil, dusting it off, covering, dusting, etc
    Last edited by YungRasputin; 01-23-2023 at 07:15 PM.
    het for nothing but groovy

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to YungRasputin For This Useful Post:

    JJpeep (01-23-2023)

  9. #16
    Registered User YungRasputin's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-03-2022
    Location
    Appalachia
    Posts
    298
    Thanks
    155
    Thanked 286 Times in 157 Posts
    Images: 21
    also re: sheet moss i usually put that in areas that have desert sand, hard clay soil (“excavator clay”) - like for my GB gopher snakes, at present, there is a bottom most layer of substrate that’s a 50/50 mixture of raw peat and sand with cocofiber + repti-earth mix 70/30 on top and in some spots clay soil + desert sand mixtures 80/20 on top of that - the purpose of which to create an environment in which i can easily raise the humidity at night and then have that easily gone during the day like what happens in the Great Basin - cocofiber easily absorbs moisture while at the same time easily gives it up also (that’s why it’s not preferable for tropical enclosures)
    het for nothing but groovy

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to YungRasputin For This Useful Post:

    JJpeep (01-23-2023)

  11. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-11-2021
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    192
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 125 Times in 67 Posts
    Images: 36

    Re: Question about spotted python enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by YungRasputin View Post
    also re: sheet moss i usually put that in areas that have desert sand, hard clay soil (“excavator clay”) - like for my GB gopher snakes, at present, there is a bottom most layer of substrate that’s a 50/50 mixture of raw peat and sand with cocofiber + repti-earth mix 70/30 on top and in some spots clay soil + desert sand mixtures 80/20 on top of that - the purpose of which to create an environment in which i can easily raise the humidity at night and then have that easily gone during the day like what happens in the Great Basin - cocofiber easily absorbs moisture while at the same time easily gives it up also (that’s why it’s not preferable for tropical enclosures)
    This is all really helpful to me. I really wanted to create something like the native land the spotted is from. I wanted to create somewhat of the outback look. I also wanted to do this with a Tarahumara Mountain king I bought (who will be shipped to me when the weather breaks, which will be awhile). I wanted to do like plateaus and ledges and things. Plus wanted to give some greenery. I think these mosses could do a good job in mocking the greenery in the Sierras of Mexico. I hope what I have In my head could come to life within the environment I want to create for her as well. I think this will be challenging yet fun. I am up for it. Plus I really like plants so this should be great. Do you have photos of your enclosures. I am just interested in how you put things together. Thanks!

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to JJpeep For This Useful Post:

    YungRasputin (01-24-2023)

  13. #18
    Registered User Malum Argenteum's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-17-2021
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    264
    Thanks
    399
    Thanked 578 Times in 223 Posts
    Images: 3
    I think that the cost/benefit ratio (where 'cost' is all the keeper labor, prep, knowledge required, and risk of hassle/failure; and 'benefit' is improved animal well being on some specific metrics) is much higher for naturalistic enclosures than it is for "full bioactive", for the species under discussion here.

    Also, keep in mind that no enclosure ever created has been anything close to a 'self sustaining ecosystems'. (Look up 'Biosphere 2' for context.) Ignoring the catchphrases and focusing on exactly which element of the enclosure design provides what benefit is a good way forward, in my opinion.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Malum Argenteum For This Useful Post:

    YungRasputin (01-23-2023)

  15. #19
    Registered User YungRasputin's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-03-2022
    Location
    Appalachia
    Posts
    298
    Thanks
    155
    Thanked 286 Times in 157 Posts
    Images: 21

    Re: Question about spotted python enclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by Malum Argenteum View Post
    I think that the cost/benefit ratio (where 'cost' is all the keeper labor, prep, knowledge required, and risk of hassle/failure; and 'benefit' is improved animal well being on some specific metrics) is much higher for naturalistic enclosures than it is for "full bioactive", for the species under discussion here.

    Also, keep in mind that no enclosure ever created has been anything close to a 'self sustaining ecosystems'. (Look up 'Biosphere 2' for context.) Ignoring the catchphrases and focusing on exactly which element of the enclosure design provides what benefit is a good way forward, in my opinion.
    “self-sustaining ecosystem” is more of an ideal and expression you got me there, this is true however i would say with respect to labor, the goal of terraculture imo is to create something permanent that you can adjust as needed but otherwise let be which if you think about it, would mean that the labor involved in setting up bioactive/naturalistic enclosures would be less than that of other styles which requires a consistent shuffling of bedding materials and so on, over time

    plus i suppose it comes down to what you ultimately want from the hobby insomuch as the animals themselves are obviously number 1 but also, for me, i think terraculture is equally as groovy - it’s part and parcel, PB&J - and i think there are benefits outside from what’s said so far eg: the health benefits of beneficial bacteria within terrariums
    het for nothing but groovy

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1