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  1. #1
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    Mite Journey Post/Questions

    As some of you know, our week long resident with us came home from Repticon with mites. Heís just a little fellow, and so now we embark on that journey. Thank you to those who posted threads already for treatment options. We are going to begin his little bathhouse tomorrow.

    In looking at some of the available treatment options and products you can buy, one thing I did not see mentioned was the use of rubbing alcohol as a method of cleaning the tank. One thing that I had seen suggested that rubbing alcohol will dry out eggs from mites as well.

    My question to you is this: Iím trying to figure out how to go about getting the most bang for my buck in terms of removing both live mites and eggs from both the snake and the enclosure. What do people think about the idea of removing substrate to a bag, and shop vacíing Remaining substrate out of the tank and using small attachments to get up under the rims of the glass aquarium. (I would remove the internal filter to keep from harboring eggs) The idea would be to remove as much of the eggs and mites with suction as possible. Disinfect the shop vac at another location.

    Afterwards, while I wait for treatment to arrive (reptile spray, I think I have decided), disinfect the glass with rubbing alcohol. It doesnít leave behind harmful fumes, it dries fast, and seemingly it dehydrates mite eggs.

    Noodles is a baby so I want to steer clear of harsher chemicals, if possible. Anyone want to speak to my odds of success here using this method?

    Thoughts? Comments? Snide remarks? 😂

    Kat

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    Albert Clark (11-03-2022)

  3. #2
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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    Photos for reference to mite activity. Last photo is just a tax. He ate yesterday, but he doesnít think he did. The little hunter is in wait.



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    Albert Clark (11-03-2022)

  5. #3
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    I'm not sure that mites can or would have climbed to the top under the rims but I see no reason not to vacuum there in case. Once tank is empty, liberally spraying with rubbing alcohol is just fine- I use it now & then as one option for disinfection of glass etc. (& all the time for my feeding tongs & giant hemostats)- as you said, it evaporates safely- just keep in away from the snake (obviously). I cannot guarantee there will be nothing left of mites or eggs in the tank but there should be- EXCEPT for the mites hiding ON the snake, which get off & on. If you stay ON this for a while, it may work & I hope it does. And I would totally try Natural Chemistry spray, btw. I want only the safest options too.

    If you bathe him as previously suggested, that will take care of "most" but not likely all mites ON him- because some can hide on the face & you cannot -for obvious reason (the need to breathe)- soak his face/head. I'm totally with you on avoiding the "PAM" or Frontline type of options (which, btw, I've never used- it wasn't even an option when I had 2 different new snakes that came with mites- as it was just that long ago the last time I dealt with mites.) I haven't added any new snakes (that I didn't produce or that were w/c rescues) for a long time now, & snake mites are not an issue from wildlife- only from the captive bred snake industry. I hope they don't end up in our wild populations, but with people's snakes escaping or being dumped, it's probably only a matter of time before our wildlife has yet another human-started problem.

    Bear in mind that some people have mite recurrences thought to be from mites transferred to room surroundings (carpet? etc) or clothing of the handlers. You'll need to be vigilant for a while.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  6. #4
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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by GuardianHunter View Post
    Photos for reference to mite activity. Last photo is just a tax. He ate yesterday, but he doesnít think he did. The little hunter is in wait.


    You have observed the little buggers moving, I assume? (Pick them off manually when you see them.)
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    Indeed, yes. They move. Ugh.

  9. #6
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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    I hate mites. We had some scaly leg mites on our hens last winter and it was a solid month or slathering their legs in coconut oil. They are a huge pain to deal with.

  10. #7
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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by GuardianHunter View Post
    Indeed, yes. They move. Ugh.
    And they suck...literally.

    Applying coconut oil to chicken's legs...that HAD to be "fun", lol. BTW, never use oil (any kind) on a snake- yes, it would probably smother the mites, but it will also mess up sheds for some time to come.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    Noted.

    two of my hens were tolerant. One of them was a holy terror. We ended up having to use ivermectin on them.

    should I be concerned about eggs scattering around the floor/bed/ curtains? And are these mites species specific?
    Last edited by GuardianHunter; 11-02-2022 at 01:00 PM.

  12. #9
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    Re: Mite Journey Post/Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by GuardianHunter View Post
    Noted.

    two of my hens were tolerant. One of them was a holy terror. We ended up having to use ivermectin on them.

    should I be concerned about eggs scattering around the floor/bed/ curtains? And are these mites species specific?
    Snake mites are pretty species-specific...however, a number of ppl claim that snake mites have "hitched a ride home on them" after visiting either a pet store or a reptile expo (& not changing clothes & showering immediately afterwards), & then invaded their own snake. Some also claim that mite eggs were left in bags of substrate that were bought from venders with snake mites on their animals (& then infested their own pets at home). I cannot verify that & it's a more remote possibility*, but just something to consider when you decide what storefronts to patronize- I just urge caution- if you see reptiles with mites in a store. (*It's more likely their own snake had one or a few eggs or mites which took a while to reproduce & become noticeable- IMO.)

    I'll just add that in the past, the only 2 snakes I've had with mites came directly shipped with mites included- so it wasn't a question of them following me home from a store on my clothing or in substrate. And at the time, I had literally a house full of snakes, but no other snakes ever got any mites- mostly because I'm not a fan of "racks" & all my snakes were (& still are) in glass tanks with apparently "enough" space between them throughout my house- they don't tend to "catch things" that way.

    And yes- if you handled this snake over your carpet, bed, etc. do a good job vacuuming & cross your fingers. I can't say for sure how far or how well they travel. I just caution that some have re-infestations of mites- that's why I suggested remaining vigilant for a while after you think they're gone. At least you only have one snake, eh? It's truly a nightmare with a collection of snakes.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 11-02-2022 at 04:06 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  14. #10
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    Images: 1
    Snake mites do tend to travel upwards, so all surfaces/areas are potential hiding spots.

    As for species-specificity, Ophionyssus natricis (there's the search term to use online if you want to try to avoid misinformation sites) are known to parasitize skinks, and occasionally humans. No reason to freak out about that, but do be aware.

    Not to dispute any recommendations made here in any way, but I personally would (and did, the one time I bought a mite-carrying snake a long time ago) use PAM. It has residual protection, as it kills mites on surfaces for some time (a month or thereabouts), and so prevents "re-infestations" (= failed treatment). Permethrin is very stable on surfaces once it dries (it is what is used in tick-repellent outdoor clothing, for example). There is published research showing PAM's safety (here).

    Other keepers have other recommendations that have worked for them, or are more in line with their own personal cost/benefit analyses. It is good to have all the facts and options at hand when making a decision.

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    Albert Clark (11-03-2022),Bogertophis (11-02-2022),GuardianHunter (11-02-2022)

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