Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 692

3 members and 689 guests
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 03:30 AM.

» Today's Birthdays

» Stats

Members: 73,204
Threads: 247,119
Posts: 2,558,912
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, goosy_19
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Registered User D-.No's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-09-2022
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts

    Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Hey Guys, my name is Dino. I’ve perusing on the boards for a bit and it’s been great!

    I have always had an enthusiastic amount of reptile and amphibian love/experience especially when was I was young. Obsessed with reading, field collecting and non-profit educational zoos.


    Of recent I was struck with some bad luck of losing my dog, my five year marriage, my stepdaughter and an injury that das been affecting me greatly half my life but the really bad for the last a year and a half. Undergoing a couple surgeries this year and decided to get a Ball python for some company. I am determined to make this snake super docile. Considering it’ll be positive therapy animal during my down time she’s the only pet I can take care of myself at the moment.


    And I feel like I got the perfect BP! She seems kind, doofy, Definitely not overaggressive for 1 1/2 month old (she hissed first feed and gave me a peck) and very beautiful. Her name is Roxy (Roxanne).


    One thing I did forgot about having reptiles is the patience. Which I am no longer, I operate a New York restaurant.


    At times I am way over concerned about her well-being even though I had her habitat ready weeks before she arrived, temporarily it’s probably a little too big. She seems fine and healthy, The oddest thing about her sometimes she awkwardly forces herself to be in the warmest part of the enclosure which is really hot.


    My big concern is how much of the boss do I show a snake? Like right now I think she is going into early sheaf. After the last handling i persuaded her into a humid hide for the first time (finally I thought) and as far as I know she has not left since. The Sphagnum moss Is definitely drying out. I tried to feed her last night and she wasn’t having it and she seemed pretty pissed off at me for bothering her. I know she doesn’t like the spray bottle but I gave a couple squirts inside the hide.


    Am I being too passive? Or should I get her out of the hide and adjust it as needed and let her figure it out or maybe use it as an opportunity to handle her again?


    Or leave her alone until she either presents herself that she’s not in shed or completes the process?

    FYI- This is not only my first Ball python but my first baby
    snake.

    Last edited by D-.No; 08-10-2022 at 07:36 PM. Reason: Addition

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to D-.No For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (08-10-2022)

  3. #2
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    18,114
    Thanks
    24,860
    Thanked 16,751 Times in 10,243 Posts
    Welcome Dino- I'm glad you finally came out of the shadows, lol. And congratulations for choosing a snake as a quiet companion. I find them to be quite congenial, & relaxing, but you'll have to learn some patience because they do things in 'snake time'. Sounds like your life has been rough lately -so sorry about your losses. Let's hope Roxy is the start of things turning around for you with better things to come.

    For us to help you- you need to accurately take the temps in the enclosure where your snake is. If your snake is always in the warmest part, that suggests it might not be warm enough, but don't assume & crank it up- get some readings on the cage floor with substrate pushed away (if using UTH); you want it at or below 90* at the most.

    You haven't had her very long, so you need to minimize HER stress, which means you should AVOID taking her out of her hide forcefully or even excessive handling until she's eaten at least 3 times at normal intervals (roughly once a week), unless in shed (when it's normal for them to refuse food). Snakes in shed definitely do NOT want to be handled, so leave her alone as much as possible. I know how frustrating that is when you have only one pet & wish to connect, but that's what you signed on for. Snakes will be snakes. Since she's staying inside the humid hide, I'd just spray into the opening as best you can.

    It's not about being a snake's "boss"- we're not & never will be. They're wild animals that listen to their own instincts- the best we can do is show them (thru respectful treatment) that they're safe with us. Snakes feel unsafe (where predators can get them!) when out in the open, so when I hold my snakes, I generally cuddle them close to me, rather than holding them out in the open which I know is scary for them. They also don't really identify us visually- so don't take it personal if your snake snaps at you from the other side of the glass (or plexi, or whatever)- they need more cues (our scent & touch) to recognize us.

    "Baby" snakes are more fearful of us because they're small & many things prey on them. Bites are either self-defense (can't blame them, we're GIANTS) or food confusion. Remember that the only thing that picks them up in nature is a predator about to eat THEM, so be patient & don't over-do handling- feeding regularly is "job #1" for a while. Like any baby, they need to grow & gain strength for a while- coming to a new home is confusing for them, so it's also very stressful & stress lowers their immune system, just as it does for us. Just like us, if they're overly stressed they can become sick from whatever they've been exposed to previously- things they might otherwise have fought off if left to rest more. So my advice with any new snake is "easy does it". Do more watching than handling for a while- they grow very slow so "taming" is not a priority.

    And don't bother trying to feed her when she's in shed- it's normal for them not to eat at that time- & since both digestion & shedding uses up the water in their bodies to accomplish, some snakes do not do both at the same time very well. Some snakes- if they do accept food while in shed (many won't) will then have a "bad shed" where they need some help to remove the zillions of stuck pieces. So like I said, go with the flow- don't push food when you know she's in shed. If you accidentally feed her sometime & then realize she's clouding up, don't panic- but I just try to avoid doing that, for best results.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 08-10-2022 at 08:21 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Albert Clark (09-07-2022),GoingPostal (08-10-2022),Homebody (08-11-2022)

  5. #3
    Registered User D-.No's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-09-2022
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts
    Thanks for the great and reassuring response. For the most part she seems really comfortable in her assorted hides. Humidity and heat gradient seems good. Since I have your ear, the other day would’ve been her third time eating and her first time with frozen. Would you keep her on live for a couple more feelings? She seemed hesitant to kill and we’ll wait for me to play/tease

    thanks!

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to D-.No For This Useful Post:

    Albert Clark (09-07-2022)

  7. #4
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    18,114
    Thanks
    24,860
    Thanked 16,751 Times in 10,243 Posts

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Quote Originally Posted by D-.No View Post
    Thanks for the great and reassuring response. For the most part she seems really comfortable in her assorted hides. Humidity and heat gradient seems good. Since I have your ear, the other day would’ve been her third time eating and her first time with frozen. Would you keep her on live for a couple more feelings? She seemed hesitant to kill and we’ll wait for me to play/tease

    thanks!
    I assume you meant the third time she has fed for you? Most breeders have fed the snake prior to selling them- do you happen to know what she was started on? Maybe she was already ON f/t- that would explain her response. (Any time you acquire a snake, it's important to find out what they've been fed, etc.)

    Some (many) snakes need to eat live at first to get the right instinctive response, just until they learn to recognize their prey- then they often switch to pre-killed (p/k, either fresh or frozen/thawed- f/t) pretty easily. But if your snake hesitates to make kills, & happily eats p/k, then no, I wouldn't keep feeding her live- enjoy how easy the switch has been for her. P/K is much better (safer, more humane, etc).
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    D-.No (08-12-2022),Homebody (08-11-2022)

  9. #5
    Registered User D-.No's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-09-2022
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Yes it would’ve been the third time but she refused it. I made the attempt because I do want to wean her off live, the breeder had her on small live rats by the time I got her.
    The second time I fed her she killed the feeder but not eat it until I made a couple attempts teasing her and she eventually took it.
    I thought why not try prekilled if she’s already excepted it once before.
    I left the carcass by her hide for 40 min, She didn’t bother with it so I threw it out. I will see how she fares with the next attempt either tomorrow or the next day

  10. #6
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    18,114
    Thanks
    24,860
    Thanked 16,751 Times in 10,243 Posts

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Quote Originally Posted by D-.No View Post
    Yes it would’ve been the third time but she refused it. I made the attempt because I do want to wean her off live, the breeder had her on small live rats by the time I got her.
    The second time I fed her she killed the feeder but not eat it until I made a couple attempts teasing her and she eventually took it.
    I thought why not try prekilled if she’s already excepted it once before.
    I left the carcass by her hide for 40 min, She didn’t bother with it so I threw it out. I will see how she fares with the next attempt either tomorrow or the next day
    Oh, I see- I misunderstood. If you've been reading threads here for a while, you know that adding some heat* to the prey is often needed to fool BPs into accepting dead prey, along with a subtle jiggle using feeding tongs. (*a blow dryer is very convenient & fast for this purpose) Sometimes even when snakes kill the feeder themselves, it cools off & they end up losing interest. I'd have done the same thing- tease her into taking it if possible. You won't win all the battles though- so get over it, lol.

    It's very possible the reason she refused it was because she knew (she could feel) that she was going into shed. They know before we can see any signs of a shed, so sometimes you just have to take your snake's "word" for it. And didn't you just say you think she's going into shed now? If so, you shouldn't be offering food at this time- wait until after she sheds, even if it's a couple weeks from now by the time she's done. That is normal- & they don't eat during shed in the wild- they don't have room service, & they don't hunt when they're blind (in shed).

    Also, when a snake refuses food- do NOT keep offering- it only stresses them into refusing. Just wait a week to offer again- and ONLY IF they're not in shed. Remember, "patience"... Relax...you'll get this.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  11. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Albert Clark (09-07-2022),Argentum (08-11-2022),D-.No (08-12-2022),Homebody (08-11-2022)

  12. #7
    Registered User D-.No's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-09-2022
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Thanks so much. Maybe her color faded a bit and her last meal was a good one. I just haven’t seen any cloudy or blue eyes. I just know she’s due for her age and her behavior is def a little more on edge since found her humid hide.
    Like I said initially, I really need to exercise my patience.

  13. #8
    BPnet Veteran Homebody's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-19-2019
    Location
    Jersey City, NJ
    Posts
    588
    Thanks
    2,198
    Thanked 713 Times in 401 Posts
    Images: 22

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Welcome. If you haven't already, give the forum's care guide a read.
    1.0 Normal Ball Python (2019 - 2021)
    1.0 Normal Children's Python (2022 - present)

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Homebody For This Useful Post:

    Albert Clark (09-07-2022),D-.No (08-12-2022)

  15. #9
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    18,114
    Thanks
    24,860
    Thanked 16,751 Times in 10,243 Posts

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Quote Originally Posted by D-.No View Post
    Thanks so much. Maybe her color faded a bit and her last meal was a good one. I just haven’t seen any cloudy or blue eyes. I just know she’s due for her age and her behavior is def a little more on edge since found her humid hide.
    Like I said initially, I really need to exercise my patience.
    Snakes manage to teach us all to mellow out, lol. At first it can be hard to tell when snakes go into shed- a small bright mini-flashlight can be useful to see the foggy eye-caps (easier in a dark room- shine across eyes from the side) if you miss them when they're most visible. I can even tell by the way their skin folds on their neck usually- it's a different texture when they're in shed- and also, sometimes you'll see a "double edge" on their scutes. Then there's the behavior cues: hiding, preferring to be cooler, defensive strikes- and food refusal is often the first thing. You'll learn.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Albert Clark (09-07-2022),D-.No (08-12-2022)

  17. #10
    BPnet Veteran Homebody's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-19-2019
    Location
    Jersey City, NJ
    Posts
    588
    Thanks
    2,198
    Thanked 713 Times in 401 Posts
    Images: 22

    Re: Humid Hide, Handling BP & Introduction

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    You'll learn.
    Don't feel bad if it takes you a while to learn. I could never tell when my bp was going into shed. I somehow always missed the bluing of the eyes part. I can only tell my Children's python is going into shed because the change in his behavior is so dramatic. He goes from being out and active to always hiding.
    1.0 Normal Ball Python (2019 - 2021)
    1.0 Normal Children's Python (2022 - present)

  18. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Homebody For This Useful Post:

    Albert Clark (09-07-2022),Bogertophis (08-11-2022),D-.No (08-12-2022)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1