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  1. #11
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Why are scaleless bp's so rare?

    Quote Originally Posted by Homebody View Post
    When I said they're ugly, I immediately felt bad. No animal is ugly. Pitiful is a better word. They look pitiful, like a hairless cat.
    Not to worry- I took it the way you meant it, anyway. I like what nature (natural selection) came up with- I like survivors, & there are reasons that they do survive.

    Like a de-clawed cat, or a dog with ears & tails docked- that offends me too. And animals bred to be hairless- cats, rats, whatever- bleh!

    Animals should have the chance to be as healthy as they can- being so exposed & vulnerable (scaleless, etc.) is going the opposite direction.

    BTW- please don't take this to mean that I'm putting down humans who naturally go bald- I happen to think it can look great on some ppl, but if they don't like the look, humans have ways to mitigate the situation anyway. For those who choose to be hairless, that too is their own choice- that's cool. But our pets do not have a choice- that's the difference, IMO. Hair, fur & scales are protection & insulation- they promote survival.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 06-09-2022 at 06:09 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  2. #12
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
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    Re: Why are scaleless bp's so rare?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    Not to worry- I took it the way you meant it, anyway. I like what nature (natural selection) came up with- I like survivors, & there are reasons that they do survive.

    Like a de-clawed cat, or a dog with ears & tails docked- that offends me too. And animals bred to be hairless- cats, rats, whatever- bleh!

    Animals should have the chance to be as healthy as they can- being so exposed & vulnerable (scaleless, etc.) is going the opposite direction.

    BTW- please don't take this to mean that I'm putting down humans who naturally go bald- I happen to think it can look great on some ppl, but if they don't like the look, humans have ways to mitigate the situation anyway. For those who choose to be hairless, that too is their own choice- that's cool. But our pets do not have a choice- that's the difference, IMO. Hair, fur & scales are protection & insulation- they promote survival.
    I'm baffled ear cropping/tail docking still exists (banned in many places but still). Cat de-clawing too to a lesser degree but at least that has something of a practical reason even if it's a lazy one (though if you're so worried about it scratching things give it toys or just don't get a cat). But the former is 100% cosmetic and serves no genuine purpose.

    One of the endless reasons why I have a hatred for the concept of "fashion." Looks over everything else, no matter how nonsensical, unethical or downright cruel.

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    Bogertophis (06-09-2022)

  4. #13
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Why are scaleless bp's so rare?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snagrio View Post
    I'm baffled ear cropping/tail docking still exists (banned in many places but still). Cat de-clawing too to a lesser degree but at least that has something of a practical reason even if it's a lazy one (though if you're so worried about it scratching things give it toys or just don't get a cat). But the former is 100% cosmetic and serves no genuine purpose.

    One of the endless reasons why I have a hatred for the concept of "fashion." Looks over everything else, no matter how nonsensical, unethical or downright cruel.
    In dogs, ear cropping & tail docking does "serve a purpose", albeit a bad one. It's so that when used for fighting (or for police/military duty), dogs have less for the opposition to grab onto & tear away. Also, the wagging tails of big dogs have been known to clear many a coffee table- but hey, wagging tails are beautiful- who looks at that expression of canine joy & says "Nope, let's cut that off!" (And let's face it, most coffee tables NEED clearing off.)

    And the only semi-reasonable excuse for de-clawing a house cat I've ever heard came from an older woman I know- cat's claws are very effective at causing infections, & even when they're just playing they cause minor injuries, which in an older person, could end up resulting in a serious infection & health risk. More & more places are banning (or trying to ban) cat declawing.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  5. #14
    Registered User DatBoiAJ_'s Avatar
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    yeah i agree with the "ugly" part. They look cool as of the blushing and fading but when they move its kinda wierd they either look mad dehydrated or like theyre about to shed

  6. #15
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    Brought back to thinking about this topic yesterday.

    Chris Hardwick just posted a video where he cut eggs from a scaleless head x scaleless head clutch.
    The scaleless egg did not pip and in fact, the snake was still in the fluid sac. He cut the snake out of it himself. I think this may have been due to the scaleless babies not being able to produce a proper egg tooth to cut out due to the scaleless gene. This can lead to egg deaths if not caught in time.
    I wonder if Chris hadn't gone back to check if it was alive and cut the sac open if the baby would have drowned.

    Another issue I came across is that these animals tend to constantly be in shed cycles due to the self caused injuries just by cruising about in enclosures. Someone else mentioned they have less effective heat pits and feeding can also be an issue.
    Last edited by Armiyana; 06-21-2022 at 07:29 PM.

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  8. #16
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Why are scaleless bp's so rare?

    Quote Originally Posted by Armiyana View Post
    Brought back to thinking about this topic yesterday.

    Chris Hardwick just posted a video where he cut eggs from a scaleless head x scaleless head clutch.
    The scaleless egg did not pip and in fact, the snake was still in the fluid sac. He cut the snake out of it himself. I think this may have been due to the scaleless babies not being able to produce a proper egg tooth to cut out due to the scaleless gene. This can lead to egg deaths if not caught in time.
    I wonder if Chris hadn't gone back to check if it was alive and cut the sac open if the baby would have drowned.

    Another issue I came across is that these animals tend to constantly be in shed cycles due to the self caused injuries just by cruising about in enclosures. Someone else mentioned they have less effective heat pits and feeding can also be an issue.
    Excellent points- I do think the "egg tooth" is part of the scales, & thus is likely to be absent in scaleless snakes. I personally think it's sad to knowingly breed for defects that are counter to their survival.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    Armiyana (06-21-2022),Homebody (06-21-2022)

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