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  1. #1
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
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    Small-ish low humidity-loving species?

    Yes another one of my hypothetical threads. Once my BP moves out of his current 30 gallon tank I'm essentially going to have a fully set up enclosure just, you know, sitting there. I'm not going to add anything until after he has his full PVC enclosure proper (he's going to a temporary tub system soon for now until it eventually gets here, that way I'll have the tub to use as a quarantine enclosure instead of the glass tank to start).

    Thing is, I've had horrendous luck keeping humidity at acceptable levels for a BP, often hovering at 30/40%. So what are some snake species that prefer low humidity while also not being too big for a 30 tank? First one that immediately jumped to mind was a Kenyan sand boa, but I already have a snake that acts like a pet rock most of the time so I was curious if there are any other more, "visible" options you guys can think of.

  2. #2
    BPnet Veteran Toad37's Avatar
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    Re: Small-ish low humidity-loving species?

    Any colubrid would work really. Corn snakes, king snakes, rat snakes, and milk snakes are all pretty active species and they would all do pretty good in that size enclosure with the exception of black milk snakes, they get like 6-7 foot.
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  3. #3
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
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    Re: Small-ish low humidity-loving species?

    Quote Originally Posted by Toad37 View Post
    Any colubrid would work really. Corn snakes, king snakes, rat snakes, and milk snakes are all pretty active species and they would all do pretty good in that size enclosure with the exception of black milk snakes, they get like 6-7 foot.
    Really? Huh... I was always under the impression that anything the size of an adult corn snake (who can potentially get longer than even a female BP) needed something like a 40 gallon breeder if not bigger.

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  5. #4
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Small-ish low humidity-loving species?

    Quote Originally Posted by Toad37 View Post
    Any colubrid would work really. Corn snakes, king snakes, rat snakes, and milk snakes are all pretty active species and they would all do pretty good in that size enclosure with the exception of black milk snakes, they get like 6-7 foot.
    None of those will stay small enough for a 30 gal. tank for life, which is what I think the OP is asking about? (except maybe a smaller sp. of milk snake)

    A male rosy boa would work okay- (females get larger), or a Children's python (or Aussie. spotted python). The latter (Antaresia sp.) will be fine with only a humid-hide provided- you don't need to humidify the whole tank.

    One difference- a rosy boa is mostly terrestrial, whereas the "Antaresia" group will make better use of vertical space by climbing/basking on a wide branch (or driftwood). You didn't mention if this was a "tall" 30 or a long 30 gal.- but something to consider when choosing the most appropriate pet to occupy it.

    Between you & me (I've kept all the species mentioned), the best "pets" for interaction & ease of feeding/care* are the little Antaresia pythons. Also, rosy boas tend to go off-feed in winter, males more than females, but my Aussie spotted python NEVER refuses to eat, lol. And while they have heat-sensing pits, I also make no effort to warm her prey- she couldn't care less- & these generally prefer f/t (or fresh pre-killed)- either way, live not needed. Whereas rosy boas- at least as neonates, will want live until talked into f/t- & some are easier than others to convert. (milk snakes also take f/t very well)
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 07-31-2021 at 07:04 PM.
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  7. #5
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
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    Re: Small-ish low humidity-loving species?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    None of those will stay small enough for a 30 gal. tank for life, which is what I think the OP is asking about? (except maybe a smaller sp. of milk snake)

    A male rosy boa would work okay- (females get larger), or a Children's python (or Aussie. spotted python). The latter (Antaresia sp.) will be fine with only a humid-hide provided- you don't need to humidify the whole tank.

    One difference- a rosy boa is mostly terrestrial, whereas the "Antaresia" group will make better use of vertical space by climbing/basking on a wide branch (or driftwood). You didn't mention if this was a "tall" 30 or a long 30 gal.- but something to consider when choosing the most appropriate pet to occupy it.
    A tank for life yeah. And it's a 30 gallon "long" (by technicality there's 29 gallon and 30 gallon, with the 30 being half a foot longer and slightly shorter).

  8. #6
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    https://www.reptilesmagazine.com/antaresia-pythons/ -I just snagged this link real quick- there's lot's more when you search- & they're not imported from Australia, they're c/b in the USA- not super rare, but not as plentiful as BPs or corns, but available.

    You could also look into African "house" snakes- I have no experience with those, but they stay small & seem to make good pets also.

    Also garter & ribbon snakes- but they eat way different things & aren't much for handling.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 07-31-2021 at 07:10 PM.
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  10. #7
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
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    You mentioned a smaller milk snake. What are the smallest milk snake species that are typically around on the captive-bred market?

  11. #8
    Registered User Serpentes75's Avatar
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    I think a Western Hognose snake would fit the bill of staying small and requiring low humidity.

  12. #9
    Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Small-ish low humidity-loving species?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snagrio View Post
    You mentioned a smaller milk snake. What are the smallest milk snake species that are typically around on the captive-bred market?
    Mexican milk snakes (stay small) for one, but there's probably others.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
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  13. #10
    BPnet Veteran Caitlin's Avatar
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    I'll co-sign the suggestion for one of the smaller Antaresia like a Children's Python. A male Hognose would also be fine - they are really great little snakes.

    Editing to add: the humidity levels you mention are very concerning for a Ball Python. Do you need a little help brainstorming solutions?
    Last edited by Caitlin; 08-01-2021 at 12:18 PM.
    1.0 Jungle Carpet Python 'Ziggy'
    0.1 Brazilian Rainbow Boa 'Mara'
    1.1 Tarahumara Mountain Boas 'Paco' and 'Frida'
    2.0 Dumeril's Boas 'Gyre' and 'Titan'
    1.0 Stimson's Python 'Jake'
    1.1 Children's Pythons 'Miso' and 'Ozzy'
    1.0 Anthill Python 'Cricket'
    1.0 Plains Hognose 'Peanut'
    1.1 Rough-scaled Sand Boas 'Rassi' and 'Kala'
    0.4 Oregon Red-spotted Garters
    1.0 Ball Python (BEL) 'Sugar'
    1.0 Gray-banded Kingsnake 'Nacho'
    1.0 Green Tree Python (Aru) 'Jade'

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