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  1. #11
    BPnet Royalty Zincubus's Avatar
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    Re: Milk snake nose rubbing?

    Quote Originally Posted by widget View Post
    Sorry I didn’t check back sooner. I took your advice and I gave him a rat for the first meal just to see if that would fill him up and then I will feed mice more frequently after that. His temps also do cool down a bit at night on the cool side. He was back out exploring again the day after eating.

    He is actually injuring his nose. No open wounds yet but he is peeling skin off (the same layer they shed, not a whole piece of skin).

    I am now wondering if it’s possible very regular vibrations could affect him. Because now I am also seeing my other snakes out exploring a lot and unless there’s something contagious that can cause that, there’s only one other common factor and that is that we just had new neighbors move in upstairs and they stomp, jump, and drag stuff around almost constantly all day. It scares me sometimes too with how sudden and loud it is. Somehow early in the morning and in the middle of the night they’re always up there stomping. The cages are pressed against two walls so the snakes might be feeling that. I can try moving them a couple inches out from the wall.

    Here is a picture of him from a couple weeks ago.

    That has spectacular coloration !!

    What’s the type/morph ... I’ll add it to my wanted list


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro




  2. #12
    BPnet Veteran WrongPython's Avatar
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    Re: Milk snake nose rubbing?

    That's a gorgeous snake you have there! If I may make a guess as to morph... hypo tangerine?

    I wanted to back up what was said earlier about feeding and hunting. I had a rubbing/pushing problem with my Sonoran boa last year that -- in hindsight -- seems to have been due to me not keeping up with her growth and caloric needs. For several months, she would start rubbing/pushing her face on her enclosure door not long after a feed in an effort to get out and hunt, to the point that she started developing a rub on her snout. This quickly came to an end when I upped her feeder size. Nowadays, I use any incidents of pushing or looking to get out as a cue to feed her, provided her body's had enough time to wind down from her last meal. My other boa has also started exhibiting similar behavior since he started a growth spurt, and it similarly goes away as soon as I feed him.

    If your snake's rubbing always starts a few days after a meal, then that's a good cue that it may be hunger and hunting related. Try shortening your feeding intervals and upping feeder size like the others mentioned. If you're worried about him getting overweight with shorter feeding intervals, offering leaner foods like quail or chicks might not be a bad idea. A foraging exercise or feeder puzzle within his enclosure may also help if he's one of those snakes that doesn't readily come out of "hunt/feed mode." Lori Torrini has stuff related to this on her YouTube channel.

    Seasonality may also be playing a role here. If temperatures have started getting summer-warm near you, your snake probably picked up on it. All of my snakes have been a little more lively and hungry as my weather warmed.

    Good luck! I hope you find some resolution soon.
    0.1 Sonoran Boa sigma​: "Adelita" ('19 Hypo het. leopard)
    1.0 Boa imperator longicauda: "Kuzco" ('19 het. anery)
    0.1 West Papuan Morelia spilota​: "Pandora" ('20)

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  4. #13
    Registered User widget's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for the help! Yes he is a hypo tangerine. I have to say the picture is edited slightly. I just brightened it because it was taken in bad lighting, but some people were upset that I may have been trying to make people think he’s more colorful than he actually is. Definitely not my intentions though, I just prefer brighter pictures (and I would say he actually does look that colorful in bright natural lighting).

    I think the neighbors upstairs making so much noise was the issue. I just moved the cages away from the wall and after a couple of days it seems they have all gone back to normal. I will update if they start again.

    He is my shyest/most easily stressed snake so it makes sense that he was the most affected. I’ll keep an eye on his nose to make sure he doesn’t need antibiotics.

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    Bogertophis (06-12-2021),WrongPython (06-12-2021)

  6. #14
    BPnet Veteran WrongPython's Avatar
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    Re: Milk snake nose rubbing?

    I've heard that Honduran milk snakes are on the shy side; it wouldn't surprise me that the excessive noise from your neighbors ar what upset him. Good luck moving forward!

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
    0.1 Sonoran Boa sigma​: "Adelita" ('19 Hypo het. leopard)
    1.0 Boa imperator longicauda: "Kuzco" ('19 het. anery)
    0.1 West Papuan Morelia spilota​: "Pandora" ('20)

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