Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 328

1 members and 327 guests
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 04:30 AM.


» Today's Birthdays

rakeonepow (35)

» Stats

Members: 70,417
Threads: 244,555
Posts: 2,535,699
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, JNN
Page 1 of 11 12345678910 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 103

Thread: No movement

  1. #1
    Registered User BlueOrleans1290's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-12-2021
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    110
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 50 Times in 39 Posts
    Images: 8

    No movement

    I got a new BP [her name is Sasquach, Sas for short] almost a month ago, the first day she arrived she moved around and everything, and now that she has settled in and I haven't been handling her because she refuses to eat, she just doesn't move from her one spot. Ever. Her temps are normal, I'm still getting humidity up because the heat lamp i added sucked it all away, but she just stays in the same spot all day long and I hardly ever see her move. I didn't think this was normal? Do I need to add more hides to encourage more movement? More things to stimulate her brain? I haven't had this problem with any other snakes. Just her. Suggestions?
    You are what you give

  2. #2
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-11-2020
    Posts
    209
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 150 Times in 81 Posts
    There may be another issue at play given she's not eating, but otherwise a ball python typically doesn't move much on principle compared to other snakes. They are both nocturnal and ambush hunters (meaning they stay in one place for long periods of time waiting for prey to pass by), which means they not only don't have much reason to move, but the times they do move are likely when we're sleeping.

    My own BP is very much the same as yours, explored a lot when he first arrived and then hunkered down to one hide and almost never leaves it. He has other hides, he has enrichment in fake foliage and climbing branches, but he's content to stay in the same place 90% of the time. Yet despite that he's perfectly healthy and eating heartily.

    Again there may be other things to look into considering your girl isn't eating, but on a base level a stationary ball python is pretty normal in most cases.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Snagrio For This Useful Post:

    EL-Ziggy (02-21-2021)

  4. #3
    Registered User BlueOrleans1290's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-12-2021
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    110
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 50 Times in 39 Posts
    Images: 8

    Re: No movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Snagrio View Post
    There may be another issue at play given she's not eating, but otherwise a ball python typically doesn't move much on principle compared to other snakes. They are both nocturnal and ambush hunters (meaning they stay in one place for long periods of time waiting for prey to pass by), which means they not only don't have much reason to move, but the times they do move are likely when we're sleeping.

    My own BP is very much the same as yours, explored a lot when he first arrived and then hunkered down to one hide and almost never leaves it. He has other hides, he has enrichment in fake foliage and climbing branches, but he's content to stay in the same place 90% of the time. Yet despite that he's perfectly healthy and eating heartily.

    Again there may be other things to look into considering your girl isn't eating, but on a base level a stationary ball python is pretty normal in most cases.
    That does make me feel a bit better. I'm hoping she will eat soon, but I'm not that shocked because she is fairly new and I suppose still adjusting. Thank you so much, I really appreciate it!
    You are what you give

  5. #4
    Registered User Snagrio's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-11-2020
    Posts
    209
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 150 Times in 81 Posts
    You're welcome. I've heard BPs described as "living pet rocks" before, and after having mine for some time (I got him last September) I can say with utmost confidence that such a claim is accurate.

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Snagrio For This Useful Post:

    EL-Ziggy (02-21-2021),FollowTheSun (02-23-2021)

  7. #5
    Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,657
    Thanks
    19,207
    Thanked 11,573 Times in 7,314 Posts
    We need more info, & it would also help to post pics of your set-up if possible.

    What are the temperatures- lowest, highest ("hot spot")- and where she is parked (in relation to the warmth)? What kind of enclosure? How cold is the room it's in? Is it a quiet location?

    Is that all you're using for heat- just an overhead "heat-lamp"? How much light is she sitting under? Few snakes appreciate a lot of light, so you might be better off using a CHE (ceramic heat emitter- similar to a light bulb except it doesn't put out any light) or a red or black incandescent bulb for a lot less light. No snake should be under a bright light for 24/7.

    Does she have at least 2 hides? (one cool side, one warm side) How large are they compared to her coiled up size? BPs are snakes that like to feel "back pressure"- to be cozy & snug in their hides so they know nothing can sneak up on them- ie. they're safe. What KIND of hides are they? (ie. open-ended tree bark tunnels don't offer security- they're okay as cage furniture, but don't really count as "hides".) Hides should have one door only, just big enough for a snake to fit thru after a meal, & they want a low ceiling.

    How are you taking the temperatures? (they need to be accurate).

    How old is she? Do you have any history on her? When did she hatch? What she was eating before you got her? For best results, offer the same size & kind of prey & in the same way- ie. mice or rats, approximate size, live or frozen-thawed ("f/t") or fresh-killed ("f/k"). How you offer food can either entice a hungry snake to eat or scare them into refusing; BPs are often fairly docile, so a rodent that appears to come AT them would not be natural & would scare them. Make sense? A slight jiggle to elicit a chase from the snake is far better than too much motion.
    Use feeding tongs to offer & never take a snake out of their home to feed in some other side cage.

    What time of day have you tried to feed? BPs usually feed best in evening/night hours.

    How often? If your snake refuses food, don't keep offering as that only stresses them to refuse even more. Wait at least a week before offering again, & after several weeks, maybe wait 2 weeks before offering again.

    What is the snake doing when you tried to feed? BPs are ambush-predators- they don't actively hunt for their food, they wait where they feel secure (often peeking out of their hide) until some "clueless prey" happens to pass by them within reach- within striking distance. Don't bother trying to feed a BP that's roaming their enclosure- they don't feel secure enough to eat then.

    Humidity: can be a challenge, especially in winter (our heat & A/C removes humidity from our homes, even in humid climates). The kind of substrate you use can make a huge improvement on humidity; you can also add a "humid hide". (Ask if you don't understand what that means.)

    BPs: in general are not active snakes- they tend to stay put more than many other kinds (making some ppl call them "pet rocks"), but a snake that's newly acquired will also be confused & fearful for a while- they do need time to settle in. Older snakes often take longer to adapt than young ones (how old is yours?).

    Winter temperatures- if your snake was exposed to chilly temperatures, that could make her hesitant to accept food too, instinctively.

    What other kinds of snakes do you have experience with?
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    BlueOrleans1290 (02-21-2021),dakski (02-21-2021),Hugsplox (02-22-2021),nikkubus (02-21-2021)

  9. #6
    BPnet Veteran nikkubus's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-20-2018
    Posts
    280
    Thanks
    814
    Thanked 326 Times in 186 Posts
    Honestly, in all my time keeping BPs, I get a lot more concerned when they are active than when they aren't. Most of mine don't move much at all when they aren't thinking it's food time.

    Double check all your temps and humidity is good, make sure you have enough in the enclosure that there aren't barren spots that seem "unsafe" to her, but other than that I wouldn't worry about it.
    7.22 BP 1.4 corn 1.1 SD retic 0.1 hognose

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to nikkubus For This Useful Post:

    BlueOrleans1290 (02-21-2021),dakski (02-21-2021),EL-Ziggy (02-21-2021),FollowTheSun (02-23-2021)

  11. #7
    BPnet Senior Member dakski's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-08-2014
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,017
    Thanks
    6,207
    Thanked 7,422 Times in 3,142 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images: 134

    Re: No movement

    I agree with Bogertophis. Please answer those questions so we can get a better idea of what might be wrong.

    Yes, BP's need an adjustment period, but a month is a long time, especially if she was eating prior and if she is young.

    How old is she?

    What was she eating prior to you getting her? Live or F/T? What type of prey? Rat or mouse? What size of prey?

    You are going to want all that to be consistent if you want her to eat.

    Further, if F/T, are you sure you are defrosting and offering properly? If you aren't sure, ask, and we will help you.

    Please let us know the answers to the above and to Bogertophis's questions so we can help your snake get on track.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to dakski For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (02-22-2021)

  13. #8
    Registered User BeansTheDerp's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-25-2020
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    135
    Thanks
    127
    Thanked 69 Times in 44 Posts

    Re: No movement

    my BP did the same thing, staying in the warm hide and not eating, I found out that the food we offered was to big! so we fed him two small baby fancy mice. the temps should be 87-90 on the warm side and 77-80 on the cold side. another reason could be sickness or going in shed soon. or just the plain stress of a new home. I know that once Beans ate he was super lively and looking around a lot! hope your problem is fixed!

    TIP: if the snake is around a year old and on rat pups and not eating you can get two baby mice that are still on milk, they don't do as much damage if they bite, but that's if you're feeding live. if the breeder fed F/T then feed F/T and get tips and details from the breeder, if they fed live then try what I mentioned in the beginning of the tip, just keep in mind to feed one at a time, wait for her to get it down and to yawn (to adjust jaw) and then throw the other one in and do the same!
    Last edited by BeansTheDerp; 02-21-2021 at 10:20 AM.
    No matter who you are or what you do, you are beautiful and loved. and if you think everyone hates you, then don't you think God would've Thanos snapped you out of existence? have a good day! 💗

    - meeeee

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to BeansTheDerp For This Useful Post:

    BlueOrleans1290 (02-21-2021)

  15. #9
    Registered User BlueOrleans1290's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-12-2021
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    110
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 50 Times in 39 Posts
    Images: 8

    Re: No movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    We need more info, & it would also help to post pics of your set-up if possible.

    What are the temperatures- lowest, highest ("hot spot")- and where she is parked (in relation to the warmth)? What kind of enclosure? How cold is the room it's in? Is it a quiet location?

    Is that all you're using for heat- just an overhead "heat-lamp"? How much light is she sitting under? Few snakes appreciate a lot of light, so you might be better off using a CHE (ceramic heat emitter- similar to a light bulb except it doesn't put out any light) or a red or black incandescent bulb for a lot less light. No snake should be under a bright light for 24/7.

    Does she have at least 2 hides? (one cool side, one warm side) How large are they compared to her coiled up size? BPs are snakes that like to feel "back pressure"- to be cozy & snug in their hides so they know nothing can sneak up on them- ie. they're safe. What KIND of hides are they? (ie. open-ended tree bark tunnels don't offer security- they're okay as cage furniture, but don't really count as "hides".) Hides should have one door only, just big enough for a snake to fit thru after a meal, & they want a low ceiling.

    How are you taking the temperatures? (they need to be accurate).

    How old is she? Do you have any history on her? When did she hatch? What she was eating before you got her? For best results, offer the same size & kind of prey & in the same way- ie. mice or rats, approximate size, live or frozen-thawed ("f/t") or fresh-killed ("f/k"). How you offer food can either entice a hungry snake to eat or scare them into refusing; BPs are often fairly docile, so a rodent that appears to come AT them would not be natural & would scare them. Make sense? A slight jiggle to elicit a chase from the snake is far better than too much motion.
    Use feeding tongs to offer & never take a snake out of their home to feed in some other side cage.

    What time of day have you tried to feed? BPs usually feed best in evening/night hours.

    How often? If your snake refuses food, don't keep offering as that only stresses them to refuse even more. Wait at least a week before offering again, & after several weeks, maybe wait 2 weeks before offering again.

    What is the snake doing when you tried to feed? BPs are ambush-predators- they don't actively hunt for their food, they wait where they feel secure (often peeking out of their hide) until some "clueless prey" happens to pass by them within reach- within striking distance. Don't bother trying to feed a BP that's roaming their enclosure- they don't feel secure enough to eat then.

    Humidity: can be a challenge, especially in winter (our heat & A/C removes humidity from our homes, even in humid climates). The kind of substrate you use can make a huge improvement on humidity; you can also add a "humid hide". (Ask if you don't understand what that means.)

    BPs: in general are not active snakes- they tend to stay put more than many other kinds (making some ppl call them "pet rocks"), but a snake that's newly acquired will also be confused & fearful for a while- they do need time to settle in. Older snakes often take longer to adapt than young ones (how old is yours?).

    Winter temperatures- if your snake was exposed to chilly temperatures, that could make her hesitant to accept food too, instinctively.

    What other kinds of snakes do you have experience with?
    In her low spot it ranges from 79-83, in the mid spot it ranges from 84-86, and in her warm spot, where she currently is, it ranges from 87-90 but no warmer. Because it's winter my room is about 71 degrees, and my room is the quietest one in the house. If people are yelling downstairs, you can hear it but it hardly bothers.

    I use a heat mat as well, both are controlled by thermometers, and I use an infrared heat gun to check temps about once every other day just to make sure. I'm using a red incandescent light, which I must admit puts off more light than I was expecting. Its a bulb by zoo-med, not sure if that says anything. But it had really good reviews about it so I figured I'd give it a try. The bulb turns off when it gets to the desired temperature, so it does at least give a period of no light throughout the day for her to enjoy. I don't turn my room light on unless it's day, and my window is always open for some 'natural' sun and for a regular day/night schedule.

    She is in a regular Exo-Terra right now, because I didn't want to move her into a bigger cage yet. She does have one hide, and yes it is an on ended log, [it sitting on the heat] I made sure to block both ends but the entrance though. There is some foliage on one side, and on the other side is the end of the enclosure whish has a towel over it to keep it dark. [Its also over half of the cage to help with humidity]

    She is 6 months old, and I got her almost a month ago. She was eating live fuzzy rats [and I'm still trying to work out how to get her to switch to F/T] I don't have much history on her other than that she came from a reputable breeder. It does make sense. I've tried feeding a little after mid afternoon, so I can try feeding later.

    I try once a week. And if she refuses, I offer again in a week. When I try to feed her, she's in her hide and she moves a little, sometimes she will come up to it and act interested when I jiggle it a little, but then she just goes back under her hide.

    I have experience with Red-Tailed boas, ball pythons, and a Kenyan sand boa. Not much, but it does at least give me an inkling.
    You are what you give

  16. #10
    Registered User BlueOrleans1290's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-12-2021
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    110
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 50 Times in 39 Posts
    Images: 8

    Re: No movement

    thermometers.[/QUOTE]

    Thermostats*
    You are what you give

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to BlueOrleans1290 For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (02-21-2021)

Page 1 of 11 12345678910 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1