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  1. #11
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    Re: Corn snake or Ball python

    Thank you all so much for your answers! I don't mind the problems with feeding, I'm willing to work with that. I like the idea of getting a ball python since they're more chill, would they be good reading/working buddies and be content just sitting on my neck? I'll look into the other snakes you told me about too.

  2. #12
    BPnet Veteran Bogertophis's Avatar
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    To echo what Cheesenugget just posted, corn & ball pythons are NOT the only 2 good choices for a first snake. Besides king snakes, a spotted or children's python would
    be great, as would possibly a Trans Pecos or Bairds rat snake. Trans Pecos typically stay about the same size as adult corn snakes, & do fine in a 40 gal. tank, whereas a
    Bairds rat snake will get longer & need more like a 50 gal tank, but both are quite docile when handled* & feed well, once they get past being small frightened hatchlings
    of course, & that applies to ALL snakes.

    The biggest reason I caution against BPs for a first time snake owner is that one of the hardest things to get used to is that snakes don't eat often like other pets, & when
    BPs refuse meals on TOP of that fact, many if not most people (who are animal lovers or they wouldn't have pets) get very stressed out about it, & also don't enjoy repeat
    trips to buy food that ends up getting wasted. BPs have docility, size & beauty going for them, but so do many other snakes that are just much easier to live with.

    And btw, I've had a rosy boa that was very chill around my neck too...they stay small (males up to 30", females up to 40"). They generally eat well except
    likely to refuse some meals in winter, but at least you know WHY they refuse, whereas BPs can refuse any time of year.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 05-21-2020 at 05:34 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  4. #13
    Registered User Luvyna's Avatar
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    Re: Corn snake or Ball python

    Quote Originally Posted by Rex The Rat View Post
    Thank you all so much for your answers! I don't mind the problems with feeding, I'm willing to work with that. I like the idea of getting a ball python since they're more chill, would they be good reading/working buddies and be content just sitting on my neck? I'll look into the other snakes you told me about too.
    My BP often sits with me while I use my phone and my computer. Sometimes he will even rest his head on my laptop and look at the screen as though he is watching as well! I don't know if a BP will want to stay on your neck for a long time as they are terrestrial snakes and mine gets nervous hanging from my neck, but I've found that he really likes to chill on my lap or on my stomach (if I'm lying down) while partially covered with a blanket.

    If you do choose to go with a BP, one of the best things you can do to avoid feeding issues is get a juvenile BP instead of a hatchling (300g+ and 6 months or older) and ensure that you are buying from a reputable breeder. And of course, research how to do BP husbandry correctly and have the enclosure set up properly before you bring your snake home. Humidity tends to be the most difficult thing to get right (and ambient temps can be tricky too if the temperature in your home is cooler).

    I am super glad I went with a BP as my first snake despite one of my snake keeping friends urging me to get a corn instead because I had zero snake experience. However, I researched for a couple months before getting a BP and bought from a reputable breeder, and my BP has never refused a single meal or given me any problems (setting up his enclosure was definitely a hassle though!). If you really want a BP, do your research, get a healthy snake, and you will be fine (plus you can always ask for help here!). Corns can live up to 20 years and BPs can live to 30, so make sure whichever snake you get is one you really want as they are a long term commitment.

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  6. #14
    BPnet Veteran Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Corn snake or Ball python

    Quote Originally Posted by Luvyna View Post
    ...Corns can live up to 20 years and BPs can live to 30, so make sure whichever snake you get is one you really want as they are a long term commitment.
    Corns can live beyond 20...my oldest currently is 21 & previous ones have been this old or older. But yes, all are long-term commitments.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  8. #15
    Registered User Luvyna's Avatar
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    Re: Corn snake or Ball python

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    Corns can live beyond 20...my oldest currently is 21 & previous ones have been this old or older. But yes, all are long-term commitments.
    Thanks for the correction, the wording should have been "can live to be 20 or older" instead of "can live up to 20" and the oldest ball python was reportedly 48 years old, so they can definitely live past 30.

    It's impressive your corns have such long lives, I am sure it's because they are very well cared for

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    Bogertophis (05-23-2020),Rex The Rat (05-23-2020)

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