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  1. #1
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    Multispecies enclosure Spilotes pullatus and frogs

    As some of you might remember , I keep a pair of tiger rat snakes (Spilotes pullatus) and a trio of dyeing dart frogs (Dendrobates tinctorius) in a large bioactive enclosure. I add links to a more detailed description at the end of this post.

    This cohabitation is now working for more than a year (it started in April 2019), both species are doing well. There isn’t really anything new to tell about the Spilotes, the female just shed and is now waiting for some food, the male is currently in blue.

    Since the frogs are doing quite well and are not disturbed by the snakes I thought about expanding the frog population. Another member of the Dendrobates genus is out of the question, they might interbreed and create some hybrids nobody really wants. So I was looking for something else, preferably some other physically robust frog which might be able to stand his ground in case the tinctorius decided to be bothersome.

    I was always fascinated by the golden poison frog (Phyllobates terribilis) and I was finally able to get a (supposed) pair a few weeks ago. They are German CB from 2019 and have still some growing to do, the Dendrobates are still larger than they are. With them I got a female red eyed red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas), supposedly from Costa Rica with the light green coloration, also a German CB from 2019.

    All three of them moved into the enclosure after some quarantine. While the Agalychnis found a suitable Monstera leave and stays out of trouble, the Dendrobates did try to chase the Phyllobates away, especially the females did harass the smaller frogs for several days, they did walk over them, trying to press them to the ground or just chasing them away. The Phyllobates on the other hand were sometimes a little annoyed (there are better things as a twice-your-size frog sitting on top of you) but most of the time you could clearly see their “self-confidence” (predators? We don’t have predators…). Now they occupied one of the favorite hides of the Dendrobates, at least they share it often. The commotion stopped after five or six days, now all dart frogs co-exists without bothering each other.

    The snakes did not respond to any of the newcomers, neither the new Phyllobates nor the Agalychnis.

    Here is the link to the original post
    https://ball-pythons.net/forums/show...ferent-species

    and some pictures

    Female Spilotes pullatus


    Female Dendrobates tinctorius


    Female Dendrobates tinctorius


    Agalychnis callidryas


    Agalychnis callidryas


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis


    Phyllobates terribilis and Dendrobates tinctorius for size reference
    Last edited by Roman; 05-11-2020 at 03:17 PM.
    1,0 Lampropeltis triangulum campbelli, 1,2 Gonyosoma oxycephalum, 1,2 Philodryas baroni, 1,2 Spilotes pullatus, 2,1 Spilotes sulphureus, 0,1 Gonyosoma boulengeri, 1,1 Zamenis longissimus, 0,1 Malpolon sp., 1,1 Malpolon monspessulanus

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Roman For This Useful Post:

    Team Slytherin (05-11-2020)

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