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  1. #1
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    Baby ball in 40 gallon tank?

    So i have recently bought a 40 gallon because of the AMAZING deal. I’ve researched and have read that adult balls most likely prefer being in a 30-40. I also read that baby ball bps are usually spooked by big spaces but i’ve cluttered my tank with a bunch of sticks and provided him with 3 hides. I didn’t want to go through the hassle of having to buy another tank as he grows but I kind of regret buying the 40 cause now i’m in a bigger hassle, stupid! I know! Jörmungandr was delivered to me last Friday and I haven't touched him since i put him in the tank. His paper said he eats every friday so i’m guessing he wasn’t fed before delivery. I tried offering him a f/t hopper but he wouldn’t take it, he just hides. Sometimes I do hear him roaming around at night but im scared he's stressed!! He looks a little thin to me and i was really hoping to get him a tad bit more chubby. Any help?

    His warm side remains at 88°F - 95°F
    His cool side remains at 82°F - 85°F
    he is also in a bioactive tank with a Great stuff backround and eco earth/cypress floor substrate. (He was born on Sept/19)
    Last edited by Jörmun; 12-25-2019 at 08:05 AM.

  2. #2
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    For best results a new snake should be housed as similarly to their previous home as possible, & NOT in a large, complex (or bioactive) home. Common sense really...a new home is already terrifying to a snake.

    They don't understand why their entire world just changed & many stay restless (not feeding) because they're trying to find their "home". For the same reason, feed exactly what they were fed previously- so if you
    don't know (or weren't provided that essential information) by all means ask: rat or mouse? what size? live or f/t (frozen-thawed) or f/k (fresh-killed)???

    One reason the enclosure you describe is a bad idea is that IF the snake you chose has health problems (such as mites or bloody stool), it will likely go un-noticed in such a set-up until the snake dies of something
    "mysterious" that had you used a plain arrangement* on white paper towels for substrate (so issues show up), you might have been able to save him. *plastic hides & water bowl, any clutter must be disposable

    Your tank also is too warm. If you're sure the temps. measured are accurate (& taken where the snake makes contact inside the cage) then lower the cool side by 3*, & the warm side by 4-5*. A snake that is
    too warm will also roam a lot, looking for a way out for more suitable temps. A 40 gal. is great for an adult BP, but too much for a "baby" to deal with, assuming you want him to eat?

    My advice: start over, make a suitable set-up immediately*, & don't handle this snake (other than to move into new home) until after he has eaten at least 3 times for you (at normal intervals & with no refusals).

    Baby snakes of any kind are more fragile & need to "be a snake first" (ie. concentrate on eating & thriving)...remember that anything that picks them up in the wild is a predator about to eat them! Yes they learn
    in time that we are safe to hang out with, but your first job as a snake keeper is to realize all snakes (even if captive-bred) are WILD animals first, meaning they depend on their instincts; the less you interfere with
    his instincts, the better for his survival. Stress can ultimately kill a snake, so minimize his stress with a correct set-up & no handling until he's established.

    *And BPs instinctively hide...they are ambush predators, so your little one should be in a much smaller set up.
    If you PM Steward Reptiles (https://ball-pythons.net/forums/memb...ewart_Reptiles) I'm sure she'll re-post her detailed instructions if you cannot find them in threads here.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 12-25-2019 at 11:36 AM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    rufretic (12-25-2019)

  4. #3
    BPnet Veteran rufretic's Avatar
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    Just to make it easier for you, here is the setup bogertophis is referring to: https://ball-pythons.net/forums/show...-hatchling-101

    It's cheap and easy to setup and it works. Save the 40 for when your snake gets larger but for now you need to get the little one stress free and eating regularly, that is top priority!

    Good luck!
    Last edited by rufretic; 12-25-2019 at 01:46 PM.

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    Bogertophis (12-25-2019)

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    Re: Baby ball in 40 gallon tank?

    Hi! Thanks for the reply, i fixed the problem and he is currently in a way smaller tub, similar to the rack system he was used to from the breeder. He seems to be doing way better and I hope to feed him soon.
    Last edited by Jörmun; 12-25-2019 at 02:14 PM.

  7. #5
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    Re: Baby ball in 40 gallon tank?

    So i tried feeding him a f/t hopper yesterday and left it in his little tub over night. He doesn’t want to eat and just stayed balled up. He was delivered to me last friday and his feeding schedule is every friday meaning he wasn’t fed till last last friday. I’m really worried.. he looks a little thin to me.

  8. #6
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    Re: Baby ball in 40 gallon tank?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    For best results a new snake should be housed as similarly to their previous home as possible, & NOT in a large, complex (or bioactive) home. Common sense really...a new home is already terrifying to a snake.

    They don't understand why their entire world just changed & many stay restless (not feeding) because they're trying to find their "home". For the same reason, feed exactly what they were fed previously- so if you
    don't know (or weren't provided that essential information) by all means ask: rat or mouse? what size? live or f/t (frozen-thawed) or f/k (fresh-killed)???

    One reason the enclosure you describe is a bad idea is that IF the snake you chose has health problems (such as mites or bloody stool), it will likely go un-noticed in such a set-up until the snake dies of something
    "mysterious" that had you used a plain arrangement* on white paper towels for substrate (so issues show up), you might have been able to save him. *plastic hides & water bowl, any clutter must be disposable

    Your tank also is too warm. If you're sure the temps. measured are accurate (& taken where the snake makes contact inside the cage) then lower the cool side by 3*, & the warm side by 4-5*. A snake that is
    too warm will also roam a lot, looking for a way out for more suitable temps. A 40 gal. is great for an adult BP, but too much for a "baby" to deal with, assuming you want him to eat?

    My advice: start over, make a suitable set-up immediately*, & don't handle this snake (other than to move into new home) until after he has eaten at least 3 times for you (at normal intervals & with no refusals).

    Baby snakes of any kind are more fragile & need to "be a snake first" (ie. concentrate on eating & thriving)...remember that anything that picks them up in the wild is a predator about to eat them! Yes they learn
    in time that we are safe to hang out with, but your first job as a snake keeper is to realize all snakes (even if captive-bred) are WILD animals first, meaning they depend on their instincts; the less you interfere with
    his instincts, the better for his survival. Stress can ultimately kill a snake, so minimize his stress with a correct set-up & no handling until he's established.

    *And BPs instinctively hide...they are ambush predators, so your little one should be in a much smaller set up.
    If you PM Steward Reptiles (https://ball-pythons.net/forums/memb...ewart_Reptiles) I'm sure she'll re-post her detailed instructions if you cannot find them in threads here.
    So i tried feeding him a f/t hopper yesterday, wiggled it and rubbed it against him(he didnt show interest) so ileft it in his little tub over night. He doesn’t want to eat and just stayed balled up. He was delivered to me last friday and his feeding schedule is every friday meaning he wasn’t fed till last last friday. I’m really worried.. he looks a little thin to me.
    Last edited by Jörmun; 12-27-2019 at 02:31 AM.

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