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  1. #1
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    After hitting a dog with his car, a Canadian man drove it to safety. Turns out it was a coyote


    By Ryan Prior, CNN
    Updated 7:43 PM ET, Tue December 3, 2019






    (CNN)Eli Boroditsky was driving to his night shift last week on a narrow rural road in Manitoba, Canada, when his car hit what he thought was a dog streaking across the dark road.

    After he clipped the animal, it flew into the ditch on the shoulder. He parked and used a small flashlight to get a look.
    "I thought it was a German shepherd or a husky," he told CNN news partner CBC. "I didn't think it was a wild animal."
    Boroditsky said he was reluctant to leave it lying on the side of the road.





    "It is amazing how docile it was. I was petting it," he said.
    So, to protect it from predators in the night, he picked up the animal and laid it on the floor of his Hyundai.
    Boroditsky drove the last mile or so for his 10 p.m. shift at the Bothwell Cheese factory in New Bothwell, Manitoba, just south of Winnipeg. But a coworker went out to look at the animal and delivered him a big surprise.
    That "dog," the coworker said, was actually a coyote.
    The coyote is recovering in an animal rehab center

    It wasn't immediately obvious it was wild animal. The coyote was only about 30 pounds and seemed tame, though hurt.
    But Boroditsky's coworkers, who had more experience with animals, said it looked to be a young female coyote.
    It was Tuesday night, and Boroditsky started researching where he could take the coyote to get care. But he was told he'd need to wait until the morning for someone in animal management to come pick her up.
    Over the next 11 hours, the coyote didn't even defecate or urinate while spending the night in the relative warmth of Boroditsky's car.
    One of his coworkers, Aviva Cohen, told CNN she arrived for work at 6 a.m., but although Boroditsky's shift was over, he couldn't drive home. He still had a wild animal in his backseat.
    Cohen texted a cell phone number for a nearby wildlife rehab center, and a conservation officer was able to arrive just before 9 a.m.
    Zo Nakata, the executive director of the Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre, told CNN the coyote is now recovering well at her facility. She said the coyote is between 1 and 3 years old and "getting stronger by the day."
    Nakata noted the animal sustained head trauma in the collision, along with scrapes on the face and leg.
    But she said she expects the coyote to make a full recovery and be ready for release back into the wild in a few weeks.


    She warned people to be careful if they see large animals that are wounded, because after regaining consciousness, they can lash out. She recommended people call a rehab center or their local wildlife management branch.
    "People's safety is No. 1," Nakata said.




    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  3. #2
    BPnet Lifer Zincubus's Avatar
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    Re: Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    Nice story , thank you .


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro




  4. #3
    BPnet Veteran rufretic's Avatar
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    I rescued a coyote once. It had tried to get an animal in a lose 15' piece of the black flexible drainage pipe. It was in the winter with about a foot of snow on the ground and the coyote was able to push its head into the tube but ended up getting stuck. It was at my boss's house at the time. When he came in in the morning he told me about a raccoon that was flipping around in a big pipe all over his yard through the night, he said he thought it was dead this morning but I asked if I could go try to help it and he let me. As soon as I saw it I knew it was a coyote not a raccoon. I didn't want to get bit but I wanted to try to save it. It wasn't dead, just exhausted. It's head had become frozen to the pipe so I couldn't just pull it off. I had to pour warm water on the pipe a couple buckets worth before it started to come off. It was still stuck real good though and since the coyote wasn't struggling much I decided to save it I was going to need to hold it and pull on the pipe. I struggled to get it of for a while and was getting less and less cautious as I tried. When i finally got it to pop free i ended up in a super vulnerable position where i had the coyote in my one arm and my other arm braced the pipe as it pulled off and ended up face to face with the coyote. To my surprise it just stared eye to eye with me for about 20 seconds while I tried not to make a move. It's almost like it knew I was trying to help, didn't even grawl, just stared at me within inches of my face and then just turned around and trotted off into the forest. Pretty amazing experience. They are beautiful animals and I never realized how bright their eyes are until being up close like that. Great feeling to save an animal that for sure would of died without your help.

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  6. #4
    BPnet Veteran Lord Sorril's Avatar
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    Re: Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    I thought it was going to be 'Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...' he got bit and contracted rabies and died a few days later. That would also be a very real alternate ending...
    *.* TNTC

  7. #5
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    Quote Originally Posted by rufretic View Post
    I rescued a coyote once. It had tried to get an animal in a lose 15' piece of the black flexible drainage pipe. It was in the winter with about a foot of snow on the ground and the coyote was able to push its head into the tube but ended up getting stuck. It was at my boss's house at the time. When he came in in the morning he told me about a raccoon that was flipping around in a big pipe all over his yard through the night, he said he thought it was dead this morning but I asked if I could go try to help it and he let me. As soon as I saw it I knew it was a coyote not a raccoon. I didn't want to get bit but I wanted to try to save it. It wasn't dead, just exhausted. It's head had become frozen to the pipe so I couldn't just pull it off. I had to pour warm water on the pipe a couple buckets worth before it started to come off. It was still stuck real good though and since the coyote wasn't struggling much I decided to save it I was going to need to hold it and pull on the pipe. I struggled to get it of for a while and was getting less and less cautious as I tried. When i finally got it to pop free i ended up in a super vulnerable position where i had the coyote in my one arm and my other arm braced the pipe as it pulled off and ended up face to face with the coyote. To my surprise it just stared eye to eye with me for about 20 seconds while I tried not to make a move. It's almost like it knew I was trying to help, didn't even grawl, just stared at me within inches of my face and then just turned around and trotted off into the forest. Pretty amazing experience. They are beautiful animals and I never realized how bright their eyes are until being up close like that. Great feeling to save an animal that for sure would of died without your help.
    Wild animals of all kinds never cease to amaze me in their apparent capacity to comprehend that we're there to help them. I know similar things have happened with sea
    creatures too, like those that get stuck in nets that divers help to free. What an awesome experience you had with that coyote, thanks for sharing it.
    The lasting good feeling that comes from such encounters is almost beyond words...

    I don't doubt for a moment that in both cases the coyote realized it was being helped by a human, & that many animals have far more intelligence that most humans choose to acknowledge. I had lots of coyote neighbors when I lived in the high desert, & these stories really make me miss seeing them around.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 12-04-2019 at 02:03 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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  9. #6
    BPnet Lifer Zincubus's Avatar
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    Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    Wild animals of all kinds never cease to amaze me in their apparent capacity to comprehend that we're there to help them. I know similar things have happened with sea
    creatures too, like those that get stuck in nets that divers help to free. What an awesome experience you had with that coyote, thanks for sharing it.
    The lasting good feeling that comes from such encounters is almost beyond words...

    I don't doubt for a moment that in both cases the coyote realized it was being helped by a human, & that many animals have far more intelligence that most humans choose to acknowledge. I had lots of coyote neighbors when I lived in the high desert, & these stories really make me miss seeing them around.
    Yes .. although whilst the baby seagull I fed and cared for on a two weeks in St Ives was very appreciative ... the Sparrow-hawk I rescued from between two garden sheds a few years practically ripped by hand to bits


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Last edited by Zincubus; 12-04-2019 at 03:45 PM.




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  11. #7
    BPnet Veteran rufretic's Avatar
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    Re: Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Zincubus View Post
    Yes .. although whilst the baby seagull I fed and cared for on a two weeks in St Ives was very appreciative ... the Sparrow-hawk I rescued from between two garden sheds a few years practically ripped by hand to bits


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Haha, sounds like the hawk had the same attitude many large snapping turtles I've rescued off the road had, every one would of taken my fingers off if I didn't use extreme caution! I think it comes down to types of animals, birds of prey and reptiles can both be extremely nasty whether your trying to save them or not lol.

  12. #8
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Re: Canadian man rescues a dog he accidentally hit with his car- except that...

    Quote Originally Posted by rufretic View Post
    Haha, sounds like the hawk had the same attitude many large snapping turtles I've rescued off the road had, every one would of taken my fingers off if I didn't use extreme caution! I think it comes down to types of animals, birds of prey and reptiles can both be extremely nasty whether your trying to save them or not lol.
    I think it's just like people: in any given species, there's "all kinds", & not all have the same intelligence or capacity to overcome their instincts. As I've always told folks-
    I'd rather be in a dark alley with rattlesnakes ANY day than in the same dark alley with an assortment of my "fellow man".

    For sure, these incidents could have turned out badly, as could a few times in my past, but...they didn't.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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