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  1. #1
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    Mysterious Brown Spot and Clicking.

    Hello!

    A corn snake was recently put into my care and I've noticed a couple off things

    1. He is in shed, but seems to prefer hiding through the whole process. Is that normal?
    2. I just did a quick handling session and noticed that I can hear the occasional clicking sound from him. I read on another forum that it might be his shed skin coming out of place, or his jaw relining. However, some say it's the start of an RI. It leaves me worried.
    3. He has a mysterious big brown spot on his face that looks like a scab. I'm not well-versed and how reptiles heal, so I'm wondering if I should be worrying about it or not. He seems to be acting normal despite the spot. Here's a picture. Don't worry about the white, I'm 90% sure that it's just the shed skin around it trying to come off.


  2. #2
    BPnet Senior Member Sonny1318's Avatar
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    Images: 9
    From what Iím seeing this snake looks extremely injured? The milky eye? Whereís the other? It looks damaged? It looks like it took a head injury? Peace, hope Iím wrong.
    1.0 Black Pastel Pinstripe
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    Ivylovessnakes (10-27-2019)

  4. #3
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    First off, you should NOT be handling a snake that's "in shed". You're adding a lot of stress & doing no favors for his skin either. He's hiding for a good reason,
    leave him alone, but do make sure he has a good sized water bowl & you might mist his cage a few times.

    Clicking sound when snake is in shed is likely nothing more than old skin coming off in the outer part of his nostrils...re-evaluate -listen for whistling, crackling or
    clicking sounds- AFTER he sheds. If sounds persist after a complete shed, that may be an RI, but for now, let him rest & hide. If you must pick him up for anything
    at least put his face to his bowl of water...he'll likely take a long drink of water while you hold him gently, IF you don't move & he feels he can trust you.
    Also do watch for excessive mucus or bubbling around his mouth...these are signs of an RI that has progressed & needs treatment (vet help!) immediately, but
    again, I mostly expect the clicking will stop after he sheds.

    Brown spot appears to be a scab...re-evaluate after shed...it may be a raw wound again at that time & in need of a safe topical medication. In fact, it wouldn't hurt
    to have some Vetericyn ointment on hand, I think Petco or other pet chains carry it. He probably rubbed his head on an abrasive cage top in previous home. It's
    close to his eyes & brain...it's not something you want to get infected...I'd have the ointment on hand, personally, as the scab will likely come off with the shed.

    It wouldn't hurt to give us a photo from other side of his face showing his other eye. I'm assuming it's just in shadow? but...?
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 10-27-2019 at 04:02 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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    Ivylovessnakes (10-27-2019)

  6. #4
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    Re: Mysterious Brown Spot and Clicking.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    First off, you should NOT be handling a snake that's "in shed". You're adding a lot of stress & doing no favors for his skin either. He's hiding for a good reason,
    leave him alone, but do make sure he has a good sized water bowl & you might mist his cage a few times.

    Clicking sound when snake is in shed is likely nothing more than old skin coming off in the outer part of his nostrils...re-evaluate -listen for whistling, crackling or
    clicking sounds- AFTER he sheds. If sounds persist after a complete shed, that may be an RI, but for now, let him rest & hide. If you must pick him up for anything
    at least put his face to his bowl of water...he'll likely take a long drink of water while you hold him gently, IF you don't move & he feels he can trust you.
    Also do watch for excessive mucus or bubbling around his mouth...these are signs of an RI that has progressed & needs treatment (vet help!) immediately, but
    again, I mostly expect the clicking will stop after he sheds.

    Brown spot appears to be a scab...re-evaluate after shed...it may be a raw wound again at that time & in need of a safe topical medication. In fact, it wouldn't hurt
    to have some Vetericyn ointment on hand, I think Petco or other pet chains carry it. He probably rubbed his head on an abrasive cage top in previous home. It's
    close to his eyes & brain...it's not something you want to get infected...I'd have the ointment on hand, personally, as the scab will likely come off with the shed.

    It wouldn't hurt to give us a photo from other side of his face showing his other eye. I'm assuming it's just in shadow? but...?
    Thank you so much for your reply!

    I definitely don't intend to handle him ever again during shed. I only did it now because I was unable to get a picture of his head beforehand, which was needed for this post. I fed him an hour after handling and probably won't attempt to handle for at least a week.

    Ill get the ointment as well! The top of his cage *is* abrasive, but I haven't witnessed any rubbing behavior... hmm. I'll see about potential replacements.

    Also, don't worry, he has both eyes. It's just the lighting in the image. And the area around his head/left eye only looks whitish due to the stress on the skin caused by the scab.

    Again, thank you for your comment. I'll be keeping a close eye on him.

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    Bogertophis (10-27-2019)

  8. #5
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
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    Usually best not to feed a snake in shed also. Some handle it fine, others it causes stuck sheds in a million pieces...especially snakes that have issues known or
    unknown. Both digestion and shedding pulls moisture from their body to accomplish, so "multi-tasking" can cause dehydration which ends up with a bad shed, OR
    a regurgitation, which is even worse: if that happens, you need to wait a couple weeks before feeding again, to give him time to replenish his digestive enzymes-
    and if you don't, subsequent regurges can even cause his death from dehydration or internal injuries, so it's not to be taken lightly.

    Whether or not you've witnessed any head-rubbing, it may be occurring at night when you aren't looking & he's wanting to hunt for dinner...

    You might be able to attach some smooth nylon window screen inside the more abrasive screen top, to minimize future damage. Of course, his scab could also be a
    rodent bite, I guess, if he was fed live prey? (I hope not! Corn snakes easily take f/t rodents, & they're wonderful pets, easy to live with.)

    I'm also assuming you know that corn snakes require a cooler cage than ball pythons? I say this thinking still about how he might have damaged
    his head...if he was in an excessively warm cage (before you got him, I know...) that also might be why he pushed on the top to try to escape-?
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 10-27-2019 at 09:15 PM.
    Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength.
    Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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