Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 1,494

20 members and 1,474 guests
Most users ever online was 3,642, 05-08-2016 at 08:50 AM.


» Today's Birthdays

PredatorBP (38)

» Stats

Members: 65,542
Threads: 240,258
Posts: 2,496,132
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, svtfoci2002
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-29-2019
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Re: Ball python stress and tank size?

    There is a small temperature gradient, Iím trying to improve it today. The humidity is about 57 so itís good. She also has a decent amount of substrate but Iím also adding more today as she showed how much she likes to burrow by digging her once small and cramped hide into the large one with two entrances it is today. Iíll be adding more inside the hide and around it. She simply seems to enjoy exploring almost as sheís eating fine and doesnít look stressed or scared when she sees me anymore. But Iím also new to this and am probably wrong.

  2. #12
    BPnet Veteran Craiga 01453's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-27-2017
    Location
    MA, USA
    Posts
    8,785
    Thanks
    11,162
    Thanked 7,984 Times in 4,114 Posts
    I just wanted to follow up on a few things you said...

    First, when you said you were "probably wrong"... Don't sell yourself short. You're on here trying to learn and applying what you're learning. That shows you care. So trust yourself.

    Watch your snake and learn her mannerisms and body language. When a snake is stressed you can usually tell by quick, frequent tongue flicks, quick erratic movements and you'll often be able to see the lungs expanding and contracting more quickly and noticably.

    The snake being "geared up" or in "S" shape doesn't always mean the animal is stressed. However, that strike position combined with the above indicators usually means the snake wants to be left alone.

    A calm snake will display slow, calculated movements along with steady, controlled tongue flicks.

    You're certainly getting there. Keep up the great work 👍
    You're off to a solid start and with a little more homework and experience you'll be a great snake keeper.

    Sidenote: what I said above can be applied to most species, but since we're discussing a BP my comments were made about BPs.
    ...life is beautiful...

    1.0 Vanilla het Pied BP - Tyson
    1.0 Pastel Fader BP - Dembe
    1.0 California Kingsnake - Django
    1.0 Western Hognose - Cosmo
    1.0 Borneo Short Tail Python - Juice
    1.0 Anery Kenyan Sando Boa - Willow
    2.2 Ferrets - Baloo, Chloe, Johnny & June
    0.2 Cats - Simba & Nala

  3. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-29-2019
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Re: Ball python stress and tank size?

    She is usually calm and Iím happy with that, what has me worried is she is also usually awake and ready to explore the world. She seems to enjoy being handled and out of her hide most of the time unless she has eaten. From what Iíve read itís a bad sign but she seems healthy and happy. Iím really glad to have such kind people on here to help too so thank you for that

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to EldritchPreacher For This Useful Post:

    Craiga 01453 (09-02-2019)

  5. #14
    BPnet Veteran Spoons's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-05-2014
    Posts
    295
    Thanks
    50
    Thanked 193 Times in 115 Posts

    Re: Ball python stress and tank size?

    Large tank sizes are generally fine but you have to make your snake feel secure, esp if they are shy. The larger the tank, the more hides and clutter you need to put in. Little snake in a big tank with nothing in it = stressed out little noodle - lots of cover, branches, foliage, hides will go a LONG way to helping your snake enjoy the space she is offered

    Sent from my H3223 using Tapatalk

  6. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-29-2019
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Re: Ball python stress and tank size?

    I donít think she is shy, she enjoys being out and exploring from what Iíve seen. She especially loves to climbs on anything she can whenever she can. That was part of the initial reason for this thread as she almost seems to sprang more time exploring and playing with the new cord she using to climb than sleeping now adays. It isnít frantic escape movements and she doesnít use her tongue that much anymore, she just wanders around happily.

  7. #16
    BPnet Veteran Spoons's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-05-2014
    Posts
    295
    Thanks
    50
    Thanked 193 Times in 115 Posts

    Re: Ball python stress and tank size?

    My young female is that way. Loves to climb, is not shy in the least, very active and curious. As soon as she is healthy I fully intend to give her a large tank to live in. I honestly think you need to just know your snake, see when they're stressed, know how to tell their stress and accommodate what you think they would like. As long as husbandry needs are met, that's what matters

    Sent from my H3223 using Tapatalk

  8. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-29-2019
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Re: Ball python stress and tank size?

    After I posted that she ate and took a two day nap. She has graced me with her snoot sticking out her hide to see if she wants to try and explore again. The advice you guys gave me made life so much easier. Thank you guys Iíll keep you posted on developments

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to EldritchPreacher For This Useful Post:

    Craiga 01453 (09-06-2019)

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1