Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 1,027

13 members and 1,014 guests
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 04:30 AM.


» Today's Birthdays

» Stats

Members: 66,876
Threads: 241,589
Posts: 2,508,397
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, Mfah
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11
    Registered User SilentHill's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-06-2019
    Location
    Adams Co, PA
    Posts
    283
    Thanks
    74
    Thanked 365 Times in 152 Posts
    Images: 3

    Re: Sooo someone didnít want this girl...

    i have nvr used butter worms either...may try as well!

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Gargoyle Geckos: Gorey, Gremmie, Ouija, Gojira, Bacon Bit, Pork Chop, Penny, Wednesday
    Crested Geckos: Eggs, Uno, Triscuit, Creature & Waffles
    Leopard Geckos: Rhubarb, Pepper and No-Name
    Cal Kings: Bones & Violet
    Corn snakes: Moonshine (anery tessera), Zorg (anery), Clarice (honey) & Mouse (normal)
    Trans-Pesos: Mickey & Mallory
    BPs: Charlie (super pastel), Bodhi (pied), Finn (GHI Mojave), Dublin (fire bumblebee), Falkor(mystic potion), Letty (pewter)
    BCI Boa: Specter (Fineline morph), Sunglow and/or Snow coming soon....
    SnuSnu the cat, Corbin the pit bull, Cinna the collie mix & Lily the setter mix
    Pixie the barn cat plus one little special needs bearded dragon P. Sherman
    Sydney the zero bearded dragon & Basil the mini-lop rabbit


    'everything was beautiful and nothing hurt' - vonnegut.

    www.facebook.com/SilentHillReptiles

  2. #12
    Registered User Bogertophis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-28-2018
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    10,549
    Thanks
    14,538
    Thanked 8,456 Times in 5,402 Posts
    They love wax worms & they'll definitely fatten her up some. They even like some frozen-thawed veggies, like peas & carrots. Beardies are personable pets.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Solidsnek (05-28-2019)

  4. #13
    BPnet Veteran
    Join Date
    01-18-2018
    Posts
    473
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 530 Times in 275 Posts
    If your UVB light is installed inside the enclosure, use a T8 Reptisun 10.0 with about 10-12 inches away from the light to the beardie on the basking(highest) spot.

    If your UVB light is on top of a screen mesh, use a T5 Reptisun 10.0 with no less than 10 inches away from beardie and basking spot.

    An appropriate enclosure size for an adult beardie is at least 4 foot long, 18-21" tall and wide. Of course the bigger the better. Height matters for their lizards as they are semi arboreal. They prefer to climb or even stay on their hammocks all day so hides may not be used until brumation, even then they prefer to sleep up high. The cold end should be no colder than 77-80F, lowest being 75F is still ok.

    Tiles and bricks work great for their safety and their need to climb on rough surfaces. I stack one large brick as a basking spot. Some people prefer wood pieces which is fine too.

    Hornworms can be fed more than 1x a week. They are a favorite among beardies. However, feed sparingly and in small meals as too much in one sitting can cause diarrhea. For her, I would highly recommend giving her hornworms every other day. Butter worms and black solder fly larvae are great too and can be fed as much as it will eat. Wax worms are high in fat but compared to the other feeders, should be fed sparingly.

    Your beardie is underweight. One clear indicator besides the hip bones protruding are the lack of fat reserves on its head. You should see 2 small bumps or curves on top of its head. There are other parts in the body that are also showing lack of fat, but the head is the most easy to tell.

    Keep it comfortable and feed it well. I would start her basking temps close to 98F (Adults are usually around 95F but higher does not hurt). Many beardie illnesses besides mdb cannot be detected visually. If you notice any lesions or strange coloring around her belly and other bodies, it is a seriously problem. Another is eggbinding or an egg has rotten inside her. While your vet had checked her out, I would still keep an eye on her and occasionally feel her belly for any hard masses. It is common for some owners not to provide a nesting box for the females to allow them to lay their eggs. You will have to provide one.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Cheesenugget For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (05-28-2019),ladywhipple02 (05-29-2019),Solidsnek (05-28-2019)

  6. #14
    BPnet Veteran
    Join Date
    01-18-2018
    Posts
    473
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 530 Times in 275 Posts
    Add-on post:

    Keeping a beardie is a long term financial and time commitment. They can poop quite a lot and are messy poopers so daily cleaning is needed.

    They can grow to become picky eaters or not, with many one day liking a certain type of veggies then not the following week. Variety keeps them healthy and from being bored of their salads. This can be frustrating and costly if fresh vegetables are expensive in your area.

    Enrichment with the use of hammocks and other climbing pieces are a necessity. They climb out in the wild and still enjoy doing so in captivity, so a tall enclosure can be costly and annoying to make. Taking them outside for sunning is great for them by do so with a leash designed for lizards which you can easily pick up from Amazon for less than $20. I highly recommend taking your beardie outside at least once a week. Nothing replicates the best if rays than the sun itself. Some owners report an increase in appetite and activity when they started sunning. Do not leave your beardie unattended.

    They can live to about 10 years if well cared for. Are you ready to clean its cage almost daily? Feed it every other day? In other words, TIME is what your beardie will require from you. Out of all of my 8 herps, my beardie takes up most of my time evey day to clean, feed and to take it outside for some sunning.

    While beardies are easy to care for if their husbandry is on point, the lack of time and interest is what prompt people to give them up, resulting beardies being one of the top 5 reptiles being surrendered to rescues. If you are going to rehome it, the responsibility falls on you to ensure the next owner is aware of such commitment and hopefully, be its last and forever home.

  7. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Cheesenugget For This Useful Post:

    Bogertophis (05-28-2019),ladywhipple02 (05-29-2019),SilentHill (05-28-2019),Solidsnek (05-28-2019)

  8. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-14-2019
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 37 Times in 16 Posts

    Re: Sooo someone didnít want this girl...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheesenugget View Post
    Add-on post:

    Keeping a beardie is a long term financial and time commitment. They can poop quite a lot and are messy poopers so daily cleaning is needed.

    They can grow to become picky eaters or not, with many one day liking a certain type of veggies then not the following week. Variety keeps them healthy and from being bored of their salads. This can be frustrating and costly if fresh vegetables are expensive in your area.

    Enrichment with the use of hammocks and other climbing pieces are a necessity. They climb out in the wild and still enjoy doing so in captivity, so a tall enclosure can be costly and annoying to make. Taking them outside for sunning is great for them by do so with a leash designed for lizards which you can easily pick up from Amazon for less than $20. I highly recommend taking your beardie outside at least once a week. Nothing replicates the best if rays than the sun itself. Some owners report an increase in appetite and activity when they started sunning. Do not leave your beardie unattended.

    They can live to about 10 years if well cared for. Are you ready to clean its cage almost daily? Feed it every other day? In other words, TIME is what your beardie will require from you. Out of all of my 8 herps, my beardie takes up most of my time evey day to clean, feed and to take it outside for some sunning.

    While beardies are easy to care for if their husbandry is on point, the lack of time and interest is what prompt people to give them up, resulting beardies being one of the top 5 reptiles being surrendered to rescues. If you are going to rehome it, the responsibility falls on you to ensure the next owner is aware of such commitment and hopefully, be its last and forever home.
    Well said my dude! If we refine I do have the perfect home, but if not we have needed time and resources for the animal for sure


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1