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  1. #1
    BPnet Veteran Ax01's Avatar
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    The Twilight Zone Featuring Sea Snakes

    ok i'm not referring the freaky tv anthology series but the other twilight zone, as in ocean depths past 200 meters. you see, recently some sea snakes off the coast of Australia were found swimming and hunting on the ocean floor around 245meters by deep sea research robots. one at 785 and another at 810feet. that's a distance and height greater than the Space Needle! the twilight zone is near darkness and photosynthesis for plant life is not possible. they are so resilient! really neat!



    article here and they also link the study papers: https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/a...ving-sea-snake
    A deep-diving sea snake
    Surface-dwelling serpent found in the vasty depths.

    This photograph is unlikely to win any awards for composition, but it is fascinating nonetheless.

    The image shows a sea snake caught on screen by a remote-controlled underwater camera called Ichthys, operated by gas and fuel exploration company INPEX Australia.

    The snake was going about its business 245 metres below the surface, in a deep sea “twilight zone”. The sighting smashed the previous record for the deepest sea snake spotting – a comparatively puny 133 metres.

    The sighting was made in the Browse Basin, off the coast of Australia’s Kimberley region. The footage was handed over to researchers at the University of Adelaide.

    “We have known for a long time that sea snakes can cope with diving sickness known as 'the bends' using gas exchange through their skin,” says researcher Jenna Crowe-Riddell. “But I never suspected that this ability allows sea snakes to dive to deep-sea habitats.”

    The finding is detailed in the journal Austral Ecology - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...1111/aec.12717.
    and here: https://www.upi.com/Science_News/201...2371554217600/
    Sea snake spotted making record deep dive

    April 2 (UPI) -- Scientists have observed a sea snake swimming some 800 feet beneath the ocean surface in Australia, the deepest sea snake dive on record. The previous record was 435 feet.

    An ocean floor exploration company, INPEX Australia, filmed a pair of snakes swimming at depths of 785 feet and 810 feet. The company shared the discovery with researchers at the University of Adelaide, which determined the sea snakes likely belonged to the same species. Both snakes were spotted in the Browse Basin off the coast of Western Australia.

    Scientists reported the new record in the journal Austral Ecology -https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/aec.12717.

    Sea snakes live among the tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. They are most commonly observed among the shallow waters surrounding coral reefs and river estuaries.

    Researchers assumed sea snakes max out at around 320 feet beneath the ocean surface, as the marine reptiles, like marine mammals, must periodically surface to breathe air.

    "We have known for a long time that sea snakes can cope with diving sickness known as 'the bends' using gas exchange through their skin," lead researcher Jenna Crowe-Riddell, a recent doctoral graduate at the University of Adelaide, said in a news release. "But I never suspected that this ability allows sea snakes to dive to deep-sea habitats."

    The new observations suggest there is much scientists don't understand about the behavior of sea snakes.

    "In some of the footage the snake is looking for food by poking its head into burrows in the sandy sea floor, but we don't know what type of fish they're eating or how they sense them in the dark," Crowe-Riddell said.

    The sea snakes were observed with a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV. Researchers suggest the latest discovery is an example of how scientists can partner with industry to learn more about less accessible marine environs.
    ^ Look! My new avatar!!

    Wicked ones now on IG & FB!6292

    Seaside Serpents & Exotics (SSEx) clutch one, two and three.

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Ax01 For This Useful Post:

    Alicia (04-10-2019),Alter-Echo (04-10-2019),Bodie (04-10-2019),Bogertophis (04-10-2019),Dianne (04-10-2019),Sonny1318 (04-10-2019)

  3. #2
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    Snakes are just so awesome! Thanks for re-confirming it!

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Bogertophis For This Useful Post:

    Bodie (04-10-2019)

  5. #3
    BPnet Veteran Sonny1318's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing bro, that’s some way cool . Damn, who knew.
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