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Thread: Handling a bp

  1. #11
    Registered User Jellybeans's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    I know isn't that unbelievable?!?!
    I don't think you have to be a reptile veterinarian to know that something like that is just plain crazy
    Quote Originally Posted by redshepherd View Post
    I literally still can't believe that happened LOL
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    Registered User MR Snakes's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    Quote Originally Posted by redshepherd View Post
    I literally still can't believe that happened LOL
    That's what you get when you take your snek to "Making it up as we go Vet Clinic"!

  3. #13
    Registered User samsonact's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    But who's right? Iv'e seen many different answers and idk which is right
    I'm T'd up
    I didn't see no speedbump
    I T'd off
    Dropped the top and screeched off

  4. #14
    Registered User Jellybeans's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    I think it depends on the indiv snake as for how much/often to handle
    BUT definately a couple days off to digest food properly

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  5. #15
    Registered User Scooda954's Avatar
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    Smile Re: Handling a bp

    Quote Originally Posted by samsonact View Post
    Okay I'm asking this question for the future when I get my bp, how often can I handle a bp? And how should I handle it?


    I've read that some people handle their's everyday and their snake is fine, but Iv'e also read that you should handle it only a couple times a week. I would love to have my bp on me 24/7 but that probably won't happen due to their nature. Idk I hope I get a snake who loves being held and loves giving/receiving attention.
    Honestly it depends on the snake. Iíve handle my ball python almost daily since Iíve got her at two months old. Some people say 1-2 a week or donít touch them for a couple weeks after they settle in might be just a guideline. I usually donít handle her until 24hrs after a meal if I do itís quick like 3-5 minuets. My BP also donít ball up or get frightened easy I can touch her head without a reaction. Once you learn your snake personality nothing else will matter.

  6. #16
    BPnet Lifer Zincubus's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogertophis View Post
    Great question. Any new snake should NOT be handled for a couple weeks (sorry, I know it's torture for you) allowing them time to settle in & feed successfully*
    2 or preferably 3 times before you attempt ANY handling. There's a good reason for this: the only thing that picks up a snake in the wild is a predator about to
    eat him, so instinctively, this is frightening and a huge distraction from eating. Eating is the MOST important thing for a snake to survive & be healthy. Handling
    at first will stress your snake & stress is a negative influence on their immune system as well; just being in a new home is stressful enough, & if you over-stress
    a snake, it's more likely they may become ill from whatever they've been exposed to before you brought them home. So take it slow for best results...it's worth
    the better result. Even once you get past the first couple of feedings, don't over-do the handling; your snake will get used to the idea that you're safe to be with
    but it won't happen overnight.

    The better you are at being patient, the more likely your snake will come to relax & enjoy your company. Remember how big we are compared to them...
    imagine how you'd feel if a creature at least 100 times bigger than you were to pick you up?

    Once you do pick them up, I like to keep a snake close to me so they feel sheltered. That's how they feel safest in the wild too, they hate being out in the
    open, because they're at greater risk of a predator finding them.
    ^ THIS ^




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  7. #17
    BPnet Lifer Zincubus's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    Quote Originally Posted by Zincubus View Post
    ^ THIS ^


    Plus if you're going to be handling most days apart from 48hours after a feed .... then it may be worth getting a snake that you can have a handling session first ... getting a good eater would be my priority as I've yet to find a Royal that won't tolerate handling..

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  8. #18
    Registered User FollowTheSun's Avatar
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    I just wanted to underline the part where snakes need to feel sheltered in order to be secure when held. Although it's neat-looking to have them hang out on your neck, most are looking for a place to hide. I hold my snakes so they can burrow either inside my bathrobe, or on my lap covered with a cloth. I recently discovered they love to hang out in a Christmas Stocking! So oftentimes they will sit on my desk or lap with their heads peeking out of the stocking.

    And I have to gently disagree that snakes don't love being held .. most probably don't or are indifferent. I have one who loves to be held (ratsnake), and my BP snakes seems to enjoy exploring outside the cage and finding new places to hide. It's a way to get some exercise and stretch out and stimulate their brains
    Our familiy: Noodle the albino ratsnake; Spot the Banana BP, Lucy the massive pinstripe BP, Harold the panther chameleon, Poppy the hedgehog, Bob and Ross the beta fish, Maya the dog, Max and Momo the cats, Tauntaun the Light Brahma Chicken (lives at the high school barn), two teenagers, and a very nice partner, all well-loved and cared for.

  9. #19
    Registered User FollowTheSun's Avatar
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    Re: Handling a bp

    Quote Originally Posted by samsonact View Post
    But who's right? Iv'e seen many different answers and idk which is right
    Each animal is different-- just get to know your snake and you can tell when it's relaxed and when it's stressed. There probably isn't 100% right answer. I have two very different BP's and one is definitely more relaxed and eager to explore than the other.
    Our familiy: Noodle the albino ratsnake; Spot the Banana BP, Lucy the massive pinstripe BP, Harold the panther chameleon, Poppy the hedgehog, Bob and Ross the beta fish, Maya the dog, Max and Momo the cats, Tauntaun the Light Brahma Chicken (lives at the high school barn), two teenagers, and a very nice partner, all well-loved and cared for.

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