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  1. #11
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    Re: Choosing a species

    Quote Originally Posted by Deborah View Post
    They do great, they tend to be vocal when you open their enclosure (huff and puff) must it's all bluff, once you handle them they are fine and not prone to stress at all.
    Oh that's great! I think hognoses may have just made it to the top of my list lol (just based on these basic things, of course I need to do lots more research), thanks for answering my questions!
    One last question for now, what kind of price range would I be looking at?

  2. #12
    Telling it like it is! Deborah's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing a species

    Quote Originally Posted by Ditto View Post
    Oh that's great! I think hognoses may have just made it to the top of my list lol (just based on these basic things, of course I need to do lots more research), thanks for answering my questions!
    One last question for now, what kind of price range would I be looking at?
    Depends what you look for normal go from $75/$100 for female and you have mutations that will set you back a few thousands

    You can easily get an albino female for $150.

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  4. #13
    Registered User craigafrechette's Avatar
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    Hognose are awesome little snakes. I cant give you the knowledge Deborah can, but I will advocate for them being great pets.

    They're such cute, goofy, little snakes. Lots of fun. They are hilarious when they are bluffing, they let out this adorable little hiss, hood up their necks, and sometimes bluff strike. Priceless really.

    If you're looking for something small that handles well a hognose is a great choice.
    ...life is beautiful...

    "Every man dies, not every man really lives"
    - Braveheart

    "If I can't be my own, I'd feel better dead"
    - Layne Staley, Alice In Chains

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  6. #14
    BPnet Veteran dakski's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing a species

    My two cents.

    I personally have the following snakes:

    0.1 BP
    1.1 Corn Snakes
    1.0 Carpet Python (50% Irian Jaya and 50% Darwin)
    1.0 Venezuelan True Red Tail/Dwarf BCC
    0.1 BCI

    I love my corn snakes. They are incredibly easy to keep, are generally very cheap, eat like clockwork, and 99% of the time are docile as can be. They also come in virtually any color or pattern you can think of.

    The downsides are that they are really tiny as babies and can be nippy (not that they can do any damage - they also tend to grow out of this in days or weeks) and tend to be more active when handled than many pythons or boids. Having said that, Figment, my adult male has been a total spaz since I've had him at 9G (he's now 650G and 5ft). He's crazy active. Harmless, docile, wouldn't hurt a fly, etc. However, not a great snake to show people who are timid, etc. Solana, my now 40G scaleless corn, calm as can be. So, the individual snake matters. In my experience, most corns are somewhere in between.

    I've personally had bad experiences with kings, but many others love them. I've also heard mixed things with milksnakes, but again, many others love them too.

    I've only had my Carpet Python for a little bit and he got lost in shipment and has been recovering from an RI. He's really chill and inquisitive though. I'll defer to others for more info on them.

    BCI is too big, so we will skip that, but they have incredible personalities.

    I asked a few top breeders about Dwarf Boas, including Vin Russo (Cutting Edge Herp) and Tommy Carpenter (TC Reptile), and in general, they are both more active, and often, more nippy, then their bigger BCI and BCC cousins. I did luck out and Tommy sold me a Venezuelan BCC holdback he had. Very rare and about the chillest and smallest BCC's out there. Feliz is amazing.

    Vin has incredible animals, and if you can meet him at a show, and see an animal before you buy, then I would definitely recommend him. His animals are top notch and he is a stand up guy. When I contacted him and said I wanted BCI personality in a small package, he basically said he didn't want to sell me a dwarf boa and to look for something else. However, he is not necessarily the type of breeder to pick an animal for you if temperament is important to you.

    Tommy worked with me and might do the same with you and help you choose an individual animal.

    I also do like hognose, but being immune suppressed because of a kidney transplant, and them being slightly venomous, I didn't want to take the risk. They are adorable and very chill.

    Bottom line:

    I would go corn snake if you want ease of care and choice of color or pattern.

    I would go dwarf boa if you want a little more of a challenge and can work with a breeder and get one that fits with you.

    Any further questions or points of clarification, feel free to post here, or PM me.

    Links:

    My review of Don Soderberg and SMR, where I got Solana, my Scaleless Corn Snake:

    https://ball-pythons.net/forums/show...ntain-Reptiles

    My review of TC Reptile, where I got Feliz, my Venezuelan BCC:

    https://ball-pythons.net/forums/show...le-Boa-Breeder

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  8. #15
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    Re: Choosing a species

    Quote Originally Posted by dakski View Post
    My two cents.

    I personally have the following snakes:

    0.1 BP
    1.1 Corn Snakes
    1.0 Carpet Python (50% Irian Jaya and 50% Darwin)
    1.0 Venezuelan True Red Tail/Dwarf BCC
    0.1 BCI

    I love my corn snakes. They are incredibly easy to keep, are generally very cheap, eat like clockwork, and 99% of the time are docile as can be. They also come in virtually any color or pattern you can think of.

    The downsides are that they are really tiny as babies and can be nippy (not that they can do any damage - they also tend to grow out of this in days or weeks) and tend to be more active when handled than many pythons or boids. Having said that, Figment, my adult male has been a total spaz since I've had him at 9G (he's now 650G and 5ft). He's crazy active. Harmless, docile, wouldn't hurt a fly, etc. However, not a great snake to show people who are timid, etc. Solana, my now 40G scaleless corn, calm as can be. So, the individual snake matters. In my experience, most corns are somewhere in between.

    I've personally had bad experiences with kings, but many others love them. I've also heard mixed things with milksnakes, but again, many others love them too.

    I've only had my Carpet Python for a little bit and he got lost in shipment and has been recovering from an RI. He's really chill and inquisitive though. I'll defer to others for more info on them.

    BCI is too big, so we will skip that, but they have incredible personalities.

    I asked a few top breeders about Dwarf Boas, including Vin Russo (Cutting Edge Herp) and Tommy Carpenter (TC Reptile), and in general, they are both more active, and often, more nippy, then their bigger BCI and BCC cousins. I did luck out and Tommy sold me a Venezuelan BCC holdback he had. Very rare and about the chillest and smallest BCC's out there. Feliz is amazing.

    Vin has incredible animals, and if you can meet him at a show, and see an animal before you buy, then I would definitely recommend him. His animals are top notch and he is a stand up guy. When I contacted him and said I wanted BCI personality in a small package, he basically said he didn't want to sell me a dwarf boa and to look for something else. However, he is not necessarily the type of breeder to pick an animal for you if temperament is important to you.

    Tommy worked with me and might do the same with you and help you choose an individual animal.

    I also do like hognose, but being immune suppressed because of a kidney transplant, and them being slightly venomous, I didn't want to take the risk. They are adorable and very chill.

    Bottom line:

    I would go corn snake if you want ease of care and choice of color or pattern.

    I would go dwarf boa if you want a little more of a challenge and can work with a breeder and get one that fits with you.

    Any further questions or points of clarification, feel free to post here, or PM me.

    Links:

    My review of Don Soderberg and SMR, where I got Solana, my Scaleless Corn Snake:

    https://ball-pythons.net/forums/show...ntain-Reptiles

    My review of TC Reptile, where I got Feliz, my Venezuelan BCC:

    https://ball-pythons.net/forums/show...le-Boa-Breeder
    Thanks so much for your reply! Very helpful
    Taking into account what you've said, I'm actually not sure I'm ready for a more challenging animal like a dwarf boa considering this will only be my second snake. Corns are very intriguing though! I'll definitely take them into consideration. Plus I think having an "easy" snake would boost my reptile keeping self esteem haha

    I kind of stalked through your progression thread for Figment a few days ago lol! He's absolutely beautiful, you've really got an amazing collection

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  10. #16
    BPnet Veteran dakski's Avatar
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    Re: Choosing a species

    Quote Originally Posted by Ditto View Post
    Thanks so much for your reply! Very helpful
    Taking into account what you've said, I'm actually not sure I'm ready for a more challenging animal like a dwarf boa considering this will only be my second snake. Corns are very intriguing though! I'll definitely take them into consideration. Plus I think having an "easy" snake would boost my reptile keeping self esteem haha

    I kind of stalked through your progression thread for Figment a few days ago lol! He's absolutely beautiful, you've really got an amazing collection
    Thank you, I really appreciate it.

    You should check out Solana's thread; she's off the charts!

    I think you would be VERY wise to get a corn snake if you are building up your "reptile keeping self esteem" as you say so well.

    Check out Don's site (South Mountain Reptiles) and give him a call if you have questions (tell him David from CT with Solana sent you), he's an awesome guy and will answer any and all of your questions and can help find a snake for you in any color, pattern, and price range.

    Again, handleable, eat like clockwork, virtually bulletproof from a husbandry standpoint, etc.

    An adult can live in a 40G breeder (and since humidity isn't a big deal with these guys - literally a 40G breeder) with CHE and/or UTH depending on room temps. If it's really dry where you are, I would mist when they go into shed or provide a moist hide, or both.

    Hot side temps/hot spot temps: 82-85F (tops) - shoot for 82-84F

    Ambient temps: 78F

    Cool side: 72F+

    I have mine in boaphiles and they are so well insulated, my cool side is a little warmer, which is fine.

    Mine are:

    Hot side: 83-84F

    Ambient: 78-80F

    Cool side: 77-78F

    Again, feel free to ask questions here or PM me anytime.

    Good luck!

  11. #17
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    Re: Choosing a species

    Quote Originally Posted by dakski View Post
    Thank you, I really appreciate it.

    You should check out Solana's thread; she's off the charts!

    I think you would be VERY wise to get a corn snake if you are building up your "reptile keeping self esteem" as you say so well.

    Check out Don's site (South Mountain Reptiles) and give him a call if you have questions (tell him David from CT with Solana sent you), he's an awesome guy and will answer any and all of your questions and can help find a snake for you in any color, pattern, and price range.

    Again, handleable, eat like clockwork, virtually bulletproof from a husbandry standpoint, etc.

    An adult can live in a 40G breeder (and since humidity isn't a big deal with these guys - literally a 40G breeder) with CHE and/or UTH depending on room temps. If it's really dry where you are, I would mist when they go into shed or provide a moist hide, or both.

    Hot side temps/hot spot temps: 82-85F (tops) - shoot for 82-84F

    Ambient temps: 78F

    Cool side: 72F+

    I have mine in boaphiles and they are so well insulated, my cool side is a little warmer, which is fine.

    Mine are:

    Hot side: 83-84F

    Ambient: 78-80F

    Cool side: 77-78F

    Again, feel free to ask questions here or PM me anytime.

    Good luck!
    I'll definitely check out that thread, thanks!
    Thank you so much for the advice, I don't have anymore questions right now aside from just more general husbandry stuff, I think I'll do some independent research for a while, February is still a ways off after all, but corns are sounding pretty perfect to me right now haha. I'm loving the idea of them not having high humidity needs, that's been my biggest struggle with my bp so far and not having to worry about that as much with a corn would be great
    I'll definitely PM you if I have any questions, thank you so much for your help!

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  13. #18
    BPnet Veteran redshepherd's Avatar
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    Just since they're very unusually kept and I basically never see them recommended anywhere ever: northern pine snakes. Mine is a growing juvie, but has already been the most interesting snake I own. Docile, and alert and comfortable with sitting near me and looking around. Easy husbandry.

    My female comes out in the mornings and afternoons to watch the world, and returns to her hide at night. Mine shows very obvious learning capability and clear behaviors, appearing more intelligent than other snake species I've kept.

    She becomes obviously comfortable with me with regular handling, and now comes out onto my hand on her own when I open the cage, like a little cat. But when I went on vacation for a couple weeks and came back, she totally forgot me the first day! Hissing and rattling like I was a stranger LOL. Then became my friend again/remembered me and hasn't turned back. It was only for that first and second day that she hasn't seen me, so clearly a recognition/learning behavior.

    She also rattles at any other person in the room that she hasn't seen before- but is comfortable with me, whether I'm flailing my hands in front of her or sticking a camera in her face. She is very discerning. But since I've moved her downstairs to a room where she sees people and dogs every day (since she comes to the front of her tank to watch the room every day), she's been comfortable around others as well. It's pretty cool!

    Since you want a smaller snake, get a male than a female. Females grow up to around 6-7 feet, but males are much smaller.
    Last edited by redshepherd; 11-30-2018 at 02:23 AM.

    Other Species
    0.1 Tanimbar Scrub Python "Pixie",
    0.1 Northern Pine Snake "Genesis"
    0.1 Dumeril's Boa "Vigil",
    0.1 2007 Aru Green Tree Python "Gem"
    1.0 Eastern Indigo "Drogon", 1.0 Blood Python "Magma"
    Ball Pythons
    0.1 Sterling "Drizzle", 1.0 Lesser Butter "Yukon"
    past: 0.4 Ball pythons, 1.0 Russian Rat Snake



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  15. #19
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    Re: Choosing a species

    Quote Originally Posted by Ditto View Post
    ...Taking into account what you've said, I'm actually not sure I'm ready for a more challenging animal like a dwarf boa considering this will only be my second snake. Corns are very intriguing though! I'll definitely take them into consideration. Plus I think having an "easy" snake would boost my reptile keeping self esteem haha...
    I'll "second" the corn snake option: I've kept snakes for many years, many kinds (some much more difficult than others) and I still enjoy my corn snakes. They're
    easy, that's a big plus: easy to keep (glass tanks work great, w/ screen top; temperatures much easier than BPs or boas, need minimal UTH heat in part of cage,
    otherwise they enjoy our "room temperatures" of 70-75*) easy to feed (happy with f/t), & normally easy to handle (docile; hatchlings are too small to even FEEL
    a defensive bite, & by the time they grow big enough for you to feel their teeth, they're tame anyway) plus they come in all sorts of beautiful colors. They enjoy and
    use branches (as do other rat snakes) & I really enjoy the "connection" & seeing my snakes without having to take them out. They're curious & watch me too.

    I'm a fan of most kinds of rat snakes (corn snakes are a type of "rat snake", there are many others!). Two of the most docile kinds are Bairds & Trans Pecos, but
    again, many other kinds & colors. (check out Everglades rat snakes if you like the color orange...but they do get bigger than corn snakes & are usually feistier.)
    All are generally easy to feed, care for, & handle, but most get larger than a corn snake & will need larger cages.

    Another fairly easy snake & small is an Australian spotted python: readily available c/b, they need warmer temps than corns & most colubrids, but are very alert & easy
    to feed on f/t (small mice at the most, these snakes don't get any bigger than a corn snake). Every bit a python (heat pits & all) but not shy, at least mine isn't...she
    enjoys basking on branches, handles easily. I've had no trouble ever in the 10+ years I've had her so far. Not a fussy eater at all. She needs a humid hide to shed.

    Oh, & there's rosy boas too...they stay 2.5-3'+ (males stay smaller, female max about 40"). They often go off-feed a bit in winter,
    but not big on fasting the way BPs can be. Usually docile, c/b & take f/t once raised properly. (if you get a neonate, make sure it has
    a strong feeding record taking f/t) Males can be fussier to feed than the females, the females eat more & get larger in anticipation of
    reproduction.
    Last edited by Bogertophis; 11-30-2018 at 02:55 AM.

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