Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 433

12 members and 421 guests
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 03:30 AM.


» Today's Birthdays

» Stats

Members: 68,322
Threads: 242,821
Posts: 2,519,713
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, rebccalim
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33
  1. #21
    John1982's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-13-2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,006
    Thanks
    2,461
    Thanked 2,950 Times in 1,666 Posts

    Re: Thinking about switching to a baby green anaconda...

    Quote Originally Posted by ArabianOak View Post
    1. I'm assuming the baby green anaconda will grow much much faster than the baby ball...how much faster?
    Too many factors and, all things equal, not all snakes grow at the same rate and reach the same adult size. Without power feeding, you're probably looking at anywhere from 3-4 feet of growth per year.

    Quote Originally Posted by ArabianOak View Post
    2. I'm assuming the baby green anaconda will be a little bit more active and feisty than the baby ball...do they move around more, are they much more feisty in general? How would someone compare from owning both?
    Not more active, probably even less active, but as a general rule they are more on the feisty side. If ball pythons are pet rocks, anacondas are just pet rocks that make you lose more blood when they get the hankering. One of my favorite hang out snakes were the anacondas because they'd simply sit for hours on end without feeling the need to move or explore. My royals are flitting hummingbirds in comparison.

    Quote Originally Posted by ArabianOak View Post
    3. Being a snake that swims and lives in a more humid climate, I am assuming I will need a small water area for the snake to swim when needed...I have also read I need to get a higher humidity for the green anaconda and slightly hotter temps...any thoughts on this?
    Unless you're going to take the time to completely change out the water daily, your better off going with a dry cage and small water dish. If you use a dish large enough to soak your anaconda will almost always relieve itself in the water. It's simply not healthy for them to soak/drink their own sewage. They're also prone to water blisters, probably from dirty water, so there's another point for a dry enclosure.

    Quote Originally Posted by ArabianOak View Post
    Anything else I need to know...is this a good idea/bad idea etc...Again, not trying to disrespect the baby ball, just want something with a little bit more character and action...
    Keep in mind that it's infinitely harder to find homes for large, aggressive snakes than most smaller species. They take up plenty of space and time. Many rescues are already full to the point that they have to refuse larger constrictors. Are you prepared to maintain this animal with the care and dedication it deserves even if you decide down the road that it's not your cup of tea anymore? There's the very real possibility that you will not find someone willing to take it off your hands.

    That said, I'm a fan of Eunectes and have kept both a yellow and green in the past. The yellow was produced by a pair of established imports while the green was, if memory serves, second generation captive bred. My advice, if after weighing all things carefully you still decide to go forward with an anaconda, is to find at least a second generation animal. You'll have a much better chance at a calmer adult. Oh yeah, on a scale of 1-10, their musk ranks an 11 in the skunky category. I hope you like stinky hands because it almost feels like an involuntary reaction with these. Even on good days, which were often enough, I would usually get musked while handling.

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to John1982 For This Useful Post:

    blbsnakes (01-02-2016),distaff (01-02-2016),Felidae (01-02-2016),KMG (01-02-2016),Reinz (01-02-2016),Stewart_Reptiles (01-02-2016)

  3. #22
    BPnet Veteran DennisM's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-19-2014
    Posts
    906
    Thanks
    104
    Thanked 570 Times in 378 Posts
    Images: 24
    So you're bored with your new pet after a few weeks. I suggest you not get any new snakes at all.

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DennisM For This Useful Post:

    blbsnakes (01-02-2016),Kokorobosoi (01-07-2016),PokeyTheNinja (01-07-2016)

  5. #23
    BPnet Senior Member Reinz's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-05-2013
    Location
    East TX
    Posts
    7,886
    Thanks
    5,157
    Thanked 4,389 Times in 3,025 Posts
    Images: 9

    Thinking about switching to a baby green anaconda...

    I have been wanting either a Retic, Burm, or Anaconda for years. In fact, I'm struggling right now with the urge to get one. I'm often weighing the excellent points that have been made here.

    Before someone runs, they must creep first, then crawl, and then walk. That's why I got a Boa after the BP, and then Carpet Pythons.

    If you want big and active, Coastal Carpets are a good choice. Not as big as the Giants, but they keep you on your toes. All of mine are sweethearts too. Lizzy is between 7-8 ft and and fun to handle, but constant motion.

    If you get an Anaconda now, you are not being fair to the snake or yourself.


    Punch, 7 foot BCI Boa. The large part of his girth is about the size of half gallon of milk. He is heavy and VERY active when out of the enclosure.



    Look to the left at the mirror. You can't see my neck.



    Lizzy the Coastal. Her girth is about the size of a quart of milk. She is EXTREMELY active when out.
    Last edited by Reinz; 01-02-2016 at 05:28 PM.
    The one thing I found that you can count on about Balls is that they are consistent about their inconsistentcy.

    1.2 Coastal Carpet Pythons
    Mack The Knife, 2013
    Lizzy, 2010
    Etta, 2013
    1.1 Jungle Carpet Pythons
    Esmarelda , 2014
    Sundance, 2012
    2.0 Common BI Boas, Punch, 2005; Butch, age?
    0.1 Normal Ball Python, Elvira, 2001
    0.1 Olive (Aussie) Python, Olivia, 2017

    Please excuse the spelling in my posts. Auto-Correct is my worst enema.

  6. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-17-2015
    Location
    Saint Charles IL
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
    thanks for all the advice gang...I went ahead and went to the show today.

    as one of you mentioned I walked around and just took a good look at all the snakes available. I asked several different vendors about anaconda's and EVERY single one said they didn't sell them because not many people want them AND they are not a snake for a beginner snake keeper.

    I left the show without making any moves and will stick with the ball for now. I feel really good about the decision and truly appreciate everyone's advice.


    I saw lots of really cool snakes today too!

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to ArabianOak For This Useful Post:

    hazzaram (01-02-2016)

  8. #25
    BPnet Senior Member KMG's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-09-2012
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    4,937
    Thanks
    915
    Thanked 2,290 Times in 1,592 Posts
    Images: 37
    That's great!
    KMG

    0.1 BP
    1.1 Blood Python
    1.0 Brazilian Rainbow Boa
    1.0 Aru Green Tree Python
    0.1 Emerald Tree Boa
    0.1 Dumeril Boa
    1.0 Western Hognose
    0.0.1 Carpet Python

    0.1 Olde English Bulldogge
    1.0 Pit Bull


  9. #26
    BPnet Senior Member Reinz's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-05-2013
    Location
    East TX
    Posts
    7,886
    Thanks
    5,157
    Thanked 4,389 Times in 3,025 Posts
    Images: 9
    Good to know, thanks!
    The one thing I found that you can count on about Balls is that they are consistent about their inconsistentcy.

    1.2 Coastal Carpet Pythons
    Mack The Knife, 2013
    Lizzy, 2010
    Etta, 2013
    1.1 Jungle Carpet Pythons
    Esmarelda , 2014
    Sundance, 2012
    2.0 Common BI Boas, Punch, 2005; Butch, age?
    0.1 Normal Ball Python, Elvira, 2001
    0.1 Olive (Aussie) Python, Olivia, 2017

    Please excuse the spelling in my posts. Auto-Correct is my worst enema.

  10. #27
    BPnet Senior Member Sauzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-26-2014
    Location
    Seattle Washington
    Posts
    6,011
    Thanks
    2,064
    Thanked 6,332 Times in 3,216 Posts
    It's not a bad idea per say but you need to be fully prepared and know everything beforehand. A ball python is a small little rock that generally doesn't have an attitude. An anaconda will grow big as in around 15' big and unless you work with it a lot, it can get a heck of an attitude. Not all are mean but I would definitely hold the animal before I purchased to gauge its temperament. Getting bit by a 10'+ snake will not be fun.If you are looking for an "active" snake, I would look more into something like a colubrid like a corn snake or maybe a hog nosed snake. They are more active and stay a lot smaller. An anaconda is not going to be a super active snakes either.

    And I agree, BPs are rocks with eyes. Both of my boas are much more into "being held" than my BP. My advice if you have not kept large snakes is go with a boa. BCI generally have very mellow temperments and if you want a large snake, get a female. They grow about 8' or larger. Both my girls are like puppy dogs and love to go riding around my shoulders or sitting on the couch or bed with me for a movie.Also remember that depending where you live and how the Lacey Act plays out, you might not be able to transport your anaconda across state lines if you have to move. Boas aren't on that list...yet.

    Bottom line there is nothing wrong owning an anaconda or wanting one or even owning one as a novice snake owner. You just need to do the research and know that you will need to provide housing, food and have another helper to move your anaconda as I would not move a 15' snake alone even if it was tame. Things can go wrong and something that big, it only takes once and you might not be around to evaluate now to do it the next time. And yes good advice is go check one out at the zoo and see its size there and then ask yourself "would you be comfortable having something that large and moving it around for cleanings and afford to feed it rabbits and piglets for its life.

    Oh another thing if you want a big snake is check out dwarf or super dwarf retic pythons. They are pretty active, really smart and don't get huge like normal retics. Only downside is they tend to be on the pricier side and you want to make sure of its blood line so you know its a super dwarf. I've been wanting a dwarf or super dwarf phantom or golden child but haven't pulled the trigger yet.
    Last edited by Sauzo; 01-04-2016 at 03:37 AM.
    0.1 Rio Bravo Pokigron Suriname BC-Gina
    1.0 Meltzer/Lincoln Peruvian Longtail het anery BCL-Louie

    0.1 Biak Green Tree Python-Pat
    ​1.0 OSHY Biak Green Tree Python-Alex
    0.0.1 Super Reduced Reticulated Gila Monster-Dozer
    0.0.1 Utah Banded Gila Monster-Tank
    0.0.1 Super Black Beaded Lizard-Reggie

  11. #28
    BPnet Senior Member Sauzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-26-2014
    Location
    Seattle Washington
    Posts
    6,011
    Thanks
    2,064
    Thanked 6,332 Times in 3,216 Posts
    Oh also forgot, keep in mind if you do get a large constrictor like an anaconda, trying to rehome something that big is not going to be an easy task. A boa? Sure. A dwarf retic morph? Sure. A 15' green anaconda? No thanks.
    0.1 Rio Bravo Pokigron Suriname BC-Gina
    1.0 Meltzer/Lincoln Peruvian Longtail het anery BCL-Louie

    0.1 Biak Green Tree Python-Pat
    ​1.0 OSHY Biak Green Tree Python-Alex
    0.0.1 Super Reduced Reticulated Gila Monster-Dozer
    0.0.1 Utah Banded Gila Monster-Tank
    0.0.1 Super Black Beaded Lizard-Reggie

  12. #29
    Registered User JoshSloane's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-16-2015
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,373
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 566 Times in 398 Posts
    Images: 5
    Going from a BP to an anaconda is like going from a teacup poodle to a wolf hybrid. Giant snakes are no joke, and are a whole different ballgame than keeping BPs. However, I do agree with others here in that I think the biggest issue is the OP's willingness to swap out the bp so quickly. Animals are not commodities to be traded or swapped randomly, unless breeding. Pending some major issue with the BP, I think its always best to stick with your current animal, learn all that you can, gain experience, and then you can add to your collection in time.

    Could you properly take care of an anaconda with an appropriate level of research, preparedness, advice and money? Absolutely, most people can if they have the time, resources and give the effort. But jumping into giant snakes after little reptile experience is always a bad idea for the snake and for the person. I can tell you that while green anacondas gained a bad reputation when they first became available as pets, captive bred animals are proving to be very tractable and gentle.
    Last edited by JoshSloane; 01-07-2016 at 11:59 AM.

  13. #30
    Registered User Kokorobosoi's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-20-2015
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    166
    Thanked 320 Times in 189 Posts
    I just want to put more emphasis on the two people per giant snake handling rule. My husband transported venomous snakes from the airport as a job. When he had to handle a burm, he got a buddy. Who was not me. I'm simply not big enough to manhandle a cranky burm. Apparently it had to be sent to a zoo. It broke its enclosure. It's healthy and happy in a zoo, Not all snakes are that lucky.

    Just picture having to explain to the neighbors that dogs cats and small children need to be kept inside until further notice because a chicken eating snake is missing. Not cool.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1