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  1. #1
    BPnet Veteran tacticalveterinarian's Avatar
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    Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes Mating! (Crotalus catalinensis)

    I was lucky enough to film this adult pair of Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes (Crotalus catalinensis) mating on display when i visited the LA Zoo in California, USA. This species is critically endangered and unique because it's tail completely lacks a rattle!


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    Reinz (05-15-2015)

  3. #2
    BPnet Veteran Sirensong26's Avatar
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    *raises hand*

    The video is really cool but...why are they categorized as a rattler if they don't have a rattle? Why not then name them as some other type of viper?
    1.0 Pinstripe - Nagini

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    BPnet Senior Member rlditmars's Avatar
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    Re: Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes Mating! (Crotalus catalinensis)

    Cool opportunity. Thanks for sharing.

  5. #4
    BPnet Veteran Najakeeper's Avatar
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    Re: Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes Mating! (Crotalus catalinensis)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirensong26 View Post
    *raises hand*

    The video is really cool but...why are they categorized as a rattler if they don't have a rattle? Why not then name them as some other type of viper?
    Because physical appereance doesn't have much to do with modern taxonomy. This species is a rattlesnake genetically speaking and just loosing the rattle doesn't kick it out of genus Crotalus. It is very closely related to Crotalus ruber.
    Last edited by Najakeeper; 05-15-2015 at 03:39 PM.

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  7. #5
    BPnet Veteran Albert Clark's Avatar
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    Re: Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes Mating! (Crotalus catalinensis)

    Thank you for that viewing and the tutorial on a Crotalus species. Impressive!
    Stay in peace and not pieces.

  8. #6
    BPnet Senior Member Reinz's Avatar
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    Very interesting, let's hope for a very large litter!

    Thanks for the video.
    The one thing I found that you can count on about Balls is that they are consistent about their inconsistentcy.

    1.2 Coastal Carpet Pythons
    Mack The Knife, 2013
    Lizzy, 2010
    Etta, 2013
    1.1 Jungle Carpet Pythons
    Esmarelda , 2014
    Sundance, 2012
    2.0 Common BI Boas, Punch, 2005; Butch, age?
    0.1 Normal Ball Python, Elvira, 2001
    0.1 Olive (Aussie) Python, Olivia, 2017

    Please excuse the spelling in my posts. Auto-Correct is my worst enema.

  9. #7
    BPnet Veteran Sirensong26's Avatar
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    Re: Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes Mating! (Crotalus catalinensis)

    Quote Originally Posted by Najakeeper View Post
    Because physical appereance doesn't have much to do with modern taxonomy. This species is a rattlesnake genetically speaking and just loosing the rattle doesn't kick it out of genus Crotalus. It is very closely related to Crotalus ruber.

    Thanks Naja!! I really didn't understand why...genetics can be extremely interesting.
    1.0 Pinstripe - Nagini

  10. #8
    BPnet Veteran tacticalveterinarian's Avatar
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    Re: Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnakes Mating! (Crotalus catalinensis)

    NajaKeeper is 100% correct!

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