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  1. #21
    BPnet Lifer Skiploder's Avatar
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    Re: Zen and the Art of Snake Maintenance

    Okay Judy - as requested:

    Mojo - 15 year old blacktail male:
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps11b8e41b.jpg


    Zeppo - 5 year old male yellow tail cribo:
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps7f9da31f.jpg
    Last edited by Skiploder; 09-14-2013 at 05:21 PM.

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  3. #22
    BPnet Veteran ARamos8's Avatar
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    Thank you for the fantastic read!!!
    Tony.....

    3.1 Crumb Snatchers
    0.1 Domestic Engineer

  4. #23
    BPnet Lifer ballpythonluvr's Avatar
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    Re: Zen and the Art of Snake Maintenance

    My gosh! I haven't posted on this forum for a very long time because it is usually just the same old stuff but Skip, this was just an awesome post! Your wisdom speaks volumes about your character. I always look forward to reading posts that you and Wes make because I know that you both have years of practice in the reptile keeping hobby. This post from you just blew my mind and I am so glad that I read it. I respect you and Wes more then anyone else on the forum. Thank you for the refreshing reminder of what "keeping" reptiles is really all about.
    1.0 boyfriend
    1.0 cat (Peeker)
    0.1 beagle/boxer mix mutt (Hailey)
    0.1 female normal ball python
    0.1 100% het pied pinstripe female ball python

  5. #24
    BPnet Senior Member Kodieh's Avatar
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    Must say, I hated that book. Nice thread though.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 4

  6. #25
    BPnet Senior Member MrLang's Avatar
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    Fantastic. Everyone, including people who aren't part of this 'hobby,' would be served well to read that. I feel like this should be the site's mission statement. People who sign up for an account should have to read that and demonstrate understanding before admittance.

    Cool to learn more about how you got into the hobby too, Skip.
    Dreamtime Exotics -- Check it out!
    Ball Pythons, Monitors, Saltwater Reef, Fancy Rats, Ferrets

  7. #26
    Registered User dr. malcom's Avatar
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    Re: Zen and the Art of Snake Maintenance

    awesome little bit! the part where you mention your black tail cribo, who had stuck eye caps reminds me of my female pastel ball python. She is a sweet girl who doesn't mind interaction, however she absolutely hates to be touched on the head/face. a couple of months ago she was bit by a rat while feeding. (yes I know there is that risk of such a thing happening when feeding live pre and yes I was watching her at the time, but couldn't see that the rat was biting her. plus I have tried many times to feed her pre kill and frozen but all she will eat is live.) The bite was just behind her mouth, in t "cheek" region and it was a pretty nasty one! I treated it with Neosporin and I was expecting to have to hold her to in order to apply it. However it was as if she knew I was trying to help her and she never even budged. I strongly believe they can sense we are trying to help them an in turn they are willing to cooperate!

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  9. #27
    Registered User BPSnape's Avatar
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    I am brand new to this forum having just purchased my first snake at the age of 45. My mother was phobic, and my husband of 21 years is phobic. He finally consented because I have wanted one badly my entire life. I find them to be beautiful, fascinating animals. I've looked here and there at some of the posts, and much of it is very detailed regarding breeding tips for getting a better chance at a specific hybrid, or other things that are way beyond me. I am glad that exists for people who enjoy such things, but I was starting to wonder where were the posts by people who are just like "hey, I love my new pet." I bought a normal ball python, which is about as common as dirt judging by what I've read, but what's important is how much joy he's brought me in the short 2 weeks I've had him. I feel like a 5 year old who got the present they thought they had no chance at.
    Last edited by BPSnape; 07-06-2015 at 11:44 PM.

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  11. #28
    BPnet Veteran EL-Ziggy's Avatar
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    Re: Zen and the Art of Snake Maintenance

    Nice analogy Snape. Snakes, and other pets, really do add another dimension to a happy life. Best wishes with your new BP.

  12. #29
    BPnet Veteran kiiarah's Avatar
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    Re: Zen and the Art of Snake Maintenance

    I am so happy to see this post get new activity because there is so much wisdom in it. Skiploader definitely seems to be known for telling it like it is, and it is impossible to deny that he knows his stuff. I had read this, but hadn't been able to relate to the comments he made about the previously testy snake being totally docile when he had to remove the eyecaps. I can relate now that I have had my little pastel bp for close to a year and have personally experienced more than one similar situation. I am actually relieved to hear that others have also observed this. I was starting to think I was going a bit off the deep end, lol.

    His first shed required assistance, as it was badly retained, and he sat perfectly still for me for 45 minutes (maybe even longer) while I worked at the loose areas. Just rested his chin on my collar bone and stayed that way the whole time. Since he was a new arrival I would have definitely expected defensiveness and a strong fear response, but even then I got the distinct impression that he understood that I was trying to help him.

    Just the other day he had a dented eye cap that was concerning because he was preparing to shed and my research indicated that it could make a retained eye cap more likely if left unresolved. Shesha is a remarkably calm snake, he even allows the top of his head to be stroked and shows no signs of nervousness or discomfort with it. The one thing he is terrified of is the spray bottle. Even if I am misting an area a good 5-6 inches away from him he always panics and whips his head back into his hide. When I read that the only feasible way to quickly treat it was to spray the eye area I was devastated because it seemed that spraying his face intentionally was, for him at least, the ultimate betrayal of the trust I have worked so hard to establish with him. I knew I had to do it so I gently started misting him from a distance while holding him and he didn't even flinch. He even flicked his tongue and periscoped a bit. I also felt honored that he was allowing me to help him, and was just so grateful that he seemed to understand and not hold it against me. Situations like that absoultely make me question whether they are as "dim witted" as they are made out to be.

    I can also relate to the overwhelming feeling of joy that I finally have this little guy. I only waited ten years but it felt like a lifetime. Nearly a year later I am still as giddy as I was the day he came home. I am absolutely head over heels for him and couldn't feel luckier to get to be a part of his life.
    1.0 Pastel Ball Python, 1.0 Red Tail Boa, 1.0 Carpet Python, 1.0 Western Hognose, 1.0 Tremper Leopard Gecko, 0.1 Chinchilla, 2.0 Cats, 1.0 Dog, 0.1 Chilean Rose Hair Tarantula, 0.0.1 Desert Blonde Tarantula.


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  14. #30
    Registered User Merriah's Avatar
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    Re: Zen and the Art of Snake Maintenance

    Agreed! I'd LOVE to meet Skip!

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