Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 602

6 members and 596 guests
Most users ever online was 6,337, 01-24-2020 at 03:30 AM.

» Today's Birthdays

None

» Stats

Members: 71,109
Threads: 245,175
Posts: 2,541,849
Top Poster: JLC (31,651)
Welcome to our newest member, Kyleea24
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31
  1. #11
    BPnet Veteran infernalis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-22-2010
    Location
    Central New York State
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 124 Times in 84 Posts
    Here is an example of a decent cage for small to medium size monitor lizards. ( I know I have Savs, but aside from your Timor being an arboreal lizard, the husbandry is nearly identical)



    I have since added a platform made from slab wood I got at a saw mill for free, it looks like this.



    If you look close, you can see the burrow hole too. They also have dug tunnels under the platforms..

    This hole on the surface is quite small, I set the cam on macro and shined a flashlight down the hole to get these.






    I will post some more for you soon... Meanwhile, enjoy a nice video.


  2. #12
    BPnet Veteran
    Join Date
    11-14-2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,103
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 430 Times in 392 Posts
    Im sorry but i have to agree with skip you did little to no research on the species. Monitors are NOT a animal you want to buy on a impulse bye. They require big cages, lots of food, do not really enjoy handling, and are very very smart. I consider most monitors to be the veloster raptor of this time. They will watch you and learn your habits, and then think about their next move.
    Ill try to help you with some of you problems with your set up.
    Cage-first you tank is to small, for a full grown timor. If your timor is a hatchling i would say ok fine it is big enough to last you around 6 months at most. The tank is not big enough for a juvi, a juvi should have around a tank that measures 4 ft by 3 ft by 4 ft. While an adult would need 5 ft by 3 ft by 6-8 ft and would be very comfortable in the cage. Timors like to be in branches they are an arboreal species, more branches for them to hide in the safer they will feel, reason for why you need a much taller cage. Lots of plants and branches, and add a few cork bark circles and they will be a much happier monitor.

    Heating/lights/Temps/humidity-Hot spot should be 120-130 degrees at the basking spot, the warm side should sit at around 90 degrees, and the cool end around 80-85 degrees. There is a a few discussions on if monitors need uv lights, i never used any uv lights for my rough neck and my argus pair, and last time i heard P.E. doesnt use uv lights either and they produced A LOT of different monitor species(robyn correct me if im wrong). You should have day lights and night lights, night time can be done by ceramic lights but do not need to be set at the same temps as the day lights, 85-78 degrees for night would be ok. timors require a higher humidity compared to other monitors humidity should be 75-85%.

    Substrate- while i agree with a lot of people that monitors do like to be able to burrow, most arboreal species usually don't, they are more comfortable in tree,hence why you need lots of branches/hides up top. a substrate that is 6-10 inches would work fine. a mixture of 50% dirt 40% sand 10% potting soil will work great, it will help keep the humidity up in the cage.

    water- Most people who deal with monitors will tell you, you will be caging the water bowl at min every day. they will poop, put substrate into this water bowl and make it more of a nasty sludge instead of clean water. I always provided a good side water bowl, large cat little pans work wonders, they are big and cheap. for my argus monitor they each got one, and were bathed once a week in the bath tub for 20-30 mins to make sure they stayed properly hydrated.

    Food- this is the best part! you will realize how much monitors eat. as your timor is growing provided lots of insects(crickets,roaches,grasshoppers) and rodents. I would suggest finding a rodent supplier and get ready to be ordering a lot of rodents. as your monitor hits adult hood it will eat more rodents and less insects but still provide insects to give it a variety in its diet.

    hope it helps.
    welcome to the never boring day when dealing with monitors! remember they are not a snake that will sit around in a hide all day. They are a lot smarter than people give them credit for.
    tom
    Tom

    Ball Pythons
    Females: Poss. het albino (Angel),Albino (Corona),Pastel Lesser (Lila),Pinstripe Het Albino (Sandy), Pastel Pied (Pandora),
    Males: Black Pastel Het Albino (Diablo),Piebald (Atlas),Killerbee (King)

    Morelia
    0.1 Jungle carpet python (Sage)
    0.0.1 Green tree python (Unknown)

    Misc.
    0.1 Snow Corn (Roxy)
    0.1 Bearded dragon (Coral-Blood X Red/Citrus)
    1.0 Diamond Back Terrapin(Crush)

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to 1nstinct For This Useful Post:

    infernalis (08-13-2012)

  4. #13
    BPnet Lifer Mike41793's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-15-2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    16,925
    Thanks
    6,661
    Thanked 7,979 Times in 5,583 Posts
    I didnt realize savs were so quick! Awesome video. I really thought they were more slow moving than that.
    1.0 normal bp
    mad roaches yo

  5. #14
    BPnet Veteran infernalis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-22-2010
    Location
    Central New York State
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 124 Times in 84 Posts

    Re: First time owner of Timor monitor

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike41793 View Post
    I didnt realize savs were so quick! Awesome video. I really thought they were more slow moving than that.
    I don't want to distract from the thread, but I'll bet that's the first video you have seen of a correctly supported Savannah Monitor.

    Check out my thread for more.. Littlefoot & Cera

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by 1nstinct View Post
    Substrate- while i agree with a lot of people that monitors do like to be able to burrow, most arboreal species usually don't, they are more comfortable in tree,hence why you need lots of branches/hides up top. a substrate that is 6-10 inches would work fine. a mixture of 50% dirt 40% sand 10% potting soil will work great, it will help keep the humidity up in the cage.
    However, by the 50% chance that this particular animal may be a female, it's just best to make sure there is enough dirt to support nesting.

    Females will cycle eggs even without a male present, and rather than risk another "I don't know what happened" egg binding, it's best to just be prepared ahead of time.
    Last edited by infernalis; 08-13-2012 at 11:35 PM.

  6. #15
    Registered User JGB24's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-10-2010
    Posts
    85
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Images: 16
    Skiploder,
    First all Id like to let you know that I did in fact do my homework.
    I dont buy reptiles without understanding what they need and how to care for them.
    Ive looked at multiple sources online as well as talking with owners face to face regarding Timor Monitors.
    I have never seen anything that says screen tops are bad. Not saying your wrong, Im just saying I never read that anywhere before, but now I know. Can you explain in more detail why they are bad?
    Also I said my basking spot was 100+ meaning it goes higher than 100. On the lower parts its 100 and then it goes up as you get higher and centered under the light. My humidity is being improved.
    Everything you just said was actually really helpful and next time you should just say that first.
    I care for many other reptiles at home and I actually know what Im doing, but this is my first monitor hence the reason I asked for tips from you guys who own or have owned.
    I posted on this site to make sure I was doing ok because I did do my research but its good to also get opinions and tips from actual owners with a lot of experience.
    So im gonna make improvements to my enclosure because you did give good advice same as the other people who posted as well and I really do appreciate it.
    Just next time help someone out instead of being so snarky. Everyone starts with their first monitor.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by 1nstinct View Post
    Im sorry but i have to agree with skip you did little to no research on the species. Monitors are NOT a animal you want to buy on a impulse bye. They require big cages, lots of food, do not really enjoy handling, and are very very smart. I consider most monitors to be the veloster raptor of this time. They will watch you and learn your habits, and then think about their next move.
    Ill try to help you with some of you problems with your set up.
    Cage-first you tank is to small, for a full grown timor. If your timor is a hatchling i would say ok fine it is big enough to last you around 6 months at most. The tank is not big enough for a juvi, a juvi should have around a tank that measures 4 ft by 3 ft by 4 ft. While an adult would need 5 ft by 3 ft by 6-8 ft and would be very comfortable in the cage. Timors like to be in branches they are an arboreal species, more branches for them to hide in the safer they will feel, reason for why you need a much taller cage. Lots of plants and branches, and add a few cork bark circles and they will be a much happier monitor.

    Heating/lights/Temps/humidity-Hot spot should be 120-130 degrees at the basking spot, the warm side should sit at around 90 degrees, and the cool end around 80-85 degrees. There is a a few discussions on if monitors need uv lights, i never used any uv lights for my rough neck and my argus pair, and last time i heard P.E. doesnt use uv lights either and they produced A LOT of different monitor species(robyn correct me if im wrong). You should have day lights and night lights, night time can be done by ceramic lights but do not need to be set at the same temps as the day lights, 85-78 degrees for night would be ok. timors require a higher humidity compared to other monitors humidity should be 75-85%.

    Substrate- while i agree with a lot of people that monitors do like to be able to burrow, most arboreal species usually don't, they are more comfortable in tree,hence why you need lots of branches/hides up top. a substrate that is 6-10 inches would work fine. a mixture of 50% dirt 40% sand 10% potting soil will work great, it will help keep the humidity up in the cage.

    water- Most people who deal with monitors will tell you, you will be caging the water bowl at min every day. they will poop, put substrate into this water bowl and make it more of a nasty sludge instead of clean water. I always provided a good side water bowl, large cat little pans work wonders, they are big and cheap. for my argus monitor they each got one, and were bathed once a week in the bath tub for 20-30 mins to make sure they stayed properly hydrated.

    Food- this is the best part! you will realize how much monitors eat. as your timor is growing provided lots of insects(crickets,roaches,grasshoppers) and rodents. I would suggest finding a rodent supplier and get ready to be ordering a lot of rodents. as your monitor hits adult hood it will eat more rodents and less insects but still provide insects to give it a variety in its diet.

    hope it helps.
    welcome to the never boring day when dealing with monitors! remember they are not a snake that will sit around in a hide all day. They are a lot smarter than people give them credit for.
    tom
    See that was helpful and I appreciate it.
    It wasn't an impulse buy.I researched it online.
    The people I bought this from and other people I talked to and some care sheets say they are not Arboreal and that they climb very little.
    So hence the reason I might have an incorrect setup. I did do research but apparently I was very misinformed which is pretty annoying.
    Ill make the changes and hopefully it will all be ok.
    Side note: Where can I get a cage of those proportions?
    Thanks!

  7. #16
    BPnet Veteran infernalis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-22-2010
    Location
    Central New York State
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 124 Times in 84 Posts
    Screen tops are bad because they allow all the humidity to escape.

    The Indonesian climate is like Miami, only hotter.



    All varanid species live quite close to the equator, where it is hot and humid.

    When you open up a monitor enclosure, the heat should belt you in the face like stepping off an air conditioned plane in Rio.

  8. #17
    BPnet Lifer Skiploder's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-03-2007
    Location
    Under a pile of wood.
    Posts
    3,581
    Thanks
    113
    Thanked 3,724 Times in 1,256 Posts
    Images: 1

    Re: First time owner of Timor monitor

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginger24 View Post
    Skiploder,
    First all Id like to let you know that I did in fact do my homework.
    I dont buy reptiles without understanding what they need and how to care for them.
    Ive looked at multiple sources online as well as talking with owners face to face regarding Timor Monitors.
    I have never seen anything that says screen tops are bad. Not saying your wrong, Im just saying I never read that anywhere before, but now I know. Can you explain in more detail why they are bad?
    Also I said my basking spot was 100+ meaning it goes higher than 100. On the lower parts its 100 and then it goes up as you get higher and centered under the light. My humidity is being improved.
    Everything you just said was actually really helpful and next time you should just say that first.
    I care for many other reptiles at home and I actually know what Im doing, but this is my first monitor hence the reason I asked for tips from you guys who own or have owned.
    I posted on this site to make sure I was doing ok because I did do my research but its good to also get opinions and tips from actual owners with a lot of experience.
    So im gonna make improvements to my enclosure because you did give good advice same as the other people who posted as well and I really do appreciate it.
    Just next time help someone out instead of being so snarky. Everyone starts with their first monitor.

    - - - Updated - - -

    See that was helpful and I appreciate it.
    It wasn't an impulse buy.I researched it online.
    The people I bought this from and other people I talked to and some care sheets say they are not Arboreal and that they climb very little.
    So hence the reason I might have an incorrect setup. I did do research but apparently I was very misinformed which is pretty annoying.
    Ill make the changes and hopefully it will all be ok.
    Side note: Where can I get a cage of those proportions?
    Thanks!
    So now we are condemning animals to suffer through our learning curve? This is a trial and error thing? You get to figure this husbandry thing out while the animal suffers? BS.

    You did not do your homework and your description of a 60 gallon glass tank with a screen top will condemn this animal to horrible fate. If there is one cardinal rule in varanid keeping, it is first and foremost no screen tops. Stop posting how this is somehow some secret squirrel info that only a few people in the know are aware of. More evidence that you did not do your homework as is the fact that you had no idea they were arboreal.

    Reading a couple crappy caresheets written by someone who copied that bad information from another dimwitted cementhead does not mean you did your homework. You have succeeded in forging ahead with buying an animal and sticking it into a lizard jerky machine. In the time that I started posting on this thread what have you changed? What have you learned? Before you post again whining about what a jackass I am, do something constructive instead - fix the gross husbandry errors you have described. Then if you want to come back and flap your gums about my bad bedside manner, go for it. But first do something to make life for that poor animal better.

    Timor monitors are not a beginner animal, no matter what some uninformed dip wad wrote on some forum - no varanid is a "beginner" animal. A timor needs a basking spot properly MEASURED at 135 to 150 degrees, a timor will burrow into a proper substrate to rehydrate in the absence of moving water and timors like to climb. You need to provide a wide range of environmental parameters correctly in a confined space or this animal will live a short and pathetic life. Half logs and plastic vines are not the answer. Proper heat, proper humidity, proper space, proper diet and proper substrate are the answer.

    Over a long span of time I have watched too many reptiles die because people arrogantly thought they had the right to buy first and learn later. This bull crap arrogant idea that a person can own whatever the heck he/she wants and that animals are disposable and replaceable give people who want to take our ownership rights away an unending stream of ammo. Stop defending your bad purchase and make immediate changes now. Once you do something positive for this animal, with photographic proof, I will stop with the snark. Deal?

    (1) Provide a proper diggable substrate that, due to the absence of water, the animal can burrow and hydrate. Soil/sand and leaf litter mixes will work.

    (2) Provide a basking spot between 135 and 150 degrees. The animal should be able to pick from several gradients via a Rete's stack or various cork tubes.

    (3) Prove a cool spot in the high 70s.

    (4) Provide an enclosure that will hold heat, hold humidity and the substrate.

    (5) A Rete's stack and/or bark tubes should provide enough security.

    (6) Provide a proper diet of insects such as crickets, roaches, etc.

    (7) Make sure the enclosure is big enough, but provides proper security.
    Last edited by Skiploder; 08-14-2012 at 12:51 AM.

  9. #18
    Registered User JGB24's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-10-2010
    Posts
    85
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Images: 16

    Re: First time owner of Timor monitor

    Ok so where can I get an enclosure matching the right measurements?
    Should I build one? if so where can I find a guide on that?
    or can I convert my 60 gallon and make it taller?
    Whats the best way to go about that?
    Also I forgot to ask what to make it out of since you said glass was bad.
    Last edited by JGB24; 08-14-2012 at 01:18 AM.

  10. #19
    BPnet Veteran infernalis's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-22-2010
    Location
    Central New York State
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 124 Times in 84 Posts
    I just showed you mine, Give me a minute and I have some others that people gave me permission to show.

    Due to the requirements of your lizard, you will have to build the enclosure or have one built for you.

    I know a young man who spent 1500 dollars on a big useless cage built by a "pro" it would be great for almost anything, but a monitor is not one of them.

  11. #20
    Registered User JGB24's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-10-2010
    Posts
    85
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Images: 16

    Re: First time owner of Timor monitor

    How would I go about building one? How did you figure out how to make yours?

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1