Vote for BP.Net for the 2013 Forum of the Year! Click here for more info.

» Site Navigation

» Home
 > FAQ

» Online Users: 295

2 members and 293 guests
Most users ever online was 3,642, 05-08-2016 at 09:50 AM.


» Today's Birthdays

Mittens (31)

» Stats

Members: 62,730
Threads: 235,982
Posts: 2,445,355
Top Poster: JLC (31,652)
Welcome to our newest member, carin
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    BPnet Lifer Skiploder's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-03-2007
    Location
    Under a pile of wood.
    Posts
    3,581
    Thanks
    113
    Thanked 3,715 Times in 1,256 Posts
    Images: 1

    Alternative Causes of URIs

    It seems that we are seeing an influx of posts concerning upper respiratory infections in snakes that, even though cultured, do not respond to multiple rounds of antibiotics.

    Upper respiratory infections in snakes can be caused by bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal infections.

    I have to admit that in many years of keeping snakes, I have not had a case of a bacterial or parasitic URI in a long term captive animal – only in imports. But I have also seen and treated parasitic and fungal causes to the infections.

    Depending on the skill and experience of the vet treating your animal, a culture (usually via tracheal wash) can either be enlightening or confusing. Many cases of bacterial URI are caused by an overgrowth of naturally occurring bacteria due to a suppressed immune system as the result of another ailment. The URI is treated, responds and then re-occurs because the underlying causative agent has not been diagnosed.

    The result of a bacterial culture will show, usually in decreasing order, the antibiotics that the suspected causative bacterium is most susceptible to.

    Therefore, if multiple rounds of antibiotic treatment prove ineffective, and if the infection is spreading rapidly through your collection, it may be time to consider that something else may be causing the URI.

    Viruses and URI
    Viruses that may show URIs as primary or secondary symptoms are varied and harder to detect. Often, they are secondary symptoms to a less noticeable primary symptom. OPMV is an example of a viral infection that can initially present with respiratory symptoms. Our vet recently told me that she is seeing quite a bit of OPMV – in fact she sees more of it than IBD.

    When I worked in Australia, several of my co-workers dealt with parvovirus outbreaks in their captive snake collections. While the main symptoms were gastrointestinal, these symptoms were acute and the first signs of distress ended up being respiratory in nature.

    One of my foremen in Perth had a large aspidites and antaresia collection that was devastated by a picornavirus outbreak. Picornaviruses include rhinoviruses which are mainly respiratory in nature. I do not recall how the virus was isolated, but I do remember that it spread rapidly through his collection and that he spent a small fortune in antibiotic treatments that had no effect.

    Parasites and URIs
    Cryptosporidiosis (Crypto) is an example of a parasitic infection that, while mainly gastric in nature, can manifest itself in the early stages as pneumonia. As the disease progresses, regurges and anorexia are more common.

    About 8 years ago, I received a WC yellow tail cribo from an importer than was infected with crypto. A fecal was performed which showed the normal imported South American bugs but nothing else. For three months the snake ate fine but had an incurable URI. Our vet would treat him, his symptoms would go away for a week or two and then return. At about 9 months, he began regurging and refusing to eat.

    I kept him in quarantine, which most likely kept the parasite from spreading to the rest of my animals. At the first signs of gastric distress, the vet performed another fecal which showed crypto. A snake with crypto does not consistently shed the parasite upon defecation, therefore one clear fecal does not necessarily mean the animal does not have crypto. Unfortunately this animal needed to be euthanized.

    I ended up throwing away the cage, water bowls and husbandry tools associated with this snake. The building I used for QT (large furnished shed) was vacated and sprayed with ammonia. I did not use it again for almost 8 months. My vet joked that I needed to burn it to the ground and then sow the site with salt. The rest of my collection was locked down and I did not breed any animals that season. I also began taking in fecal samples for random testing of all my snakes. It never reared its head again.

    There are other parasites that live in the lung of a snake such as lung mites, pentastomids and lungworms. . These usually are diagnosed via bronchoscopy.

    Fungal Causes
    Keeping your snake in a poorly ventilated but humid environment can result in myco-fungi outbreaks which can damage the lung tissue.

    Two years ago, the entire Skiploder family took a two week vacation to Montana and Idaho. Our pet sitter got a little carried away in spritzing the spilotes cages, resulting in a fungal lung infection of one of the females. When we came back there was mold growing in her cage which I noted and took a sample in to the vet. The causative fungus was aspergillis and it was treated with flucanozole.


    Bacterial Infections as Secondary
    Oftentimes, snakes can have an underlying primary health issue – be it viral, systemic, parasitic or even environmental that goes unnoticed or uncorrected. In these instances, this primary issue results in a secondary bacterial infection caused by the suppression of the immune system.

    I always suspect that in many of the cases where a bacterial URI responds favorably to antibiotic treatment and then a month or two later recurs; that there is either a husbandry related issue or a systemic problem (renal, gastro-intestinal, parasitic, etc.) that is not throwing any symptoms but is weakening the animal.

    I am not a vet and I do not intend for any advice that I give to substituted for the direction of a qualified herp vet. However, there are a lot of hack vets out there that do not perform cultures and throw antibiotics at every URI case they see. When repeated treatments do not help, it is time to consider the myriad of other possible health issues that may be affecting your animal. Please use this post only to assist you in asking your vet questions that make you feel comfortable with the course of treatment he/she is prescribing.
    Last edited by Skiploder; 07-03-2012 at 12:07 PM.

  2. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to Skiploder For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked

    Aeries (05-13-2013),B.P.'s 4me (10-19-2017),bcr229 (03-04-2016),Crowfingers (10-11-2015),Don (07-03-2012),DooLittle (07-03-2012),kitedemon (07-11-2012),littlemaxbigworld (05-08-2018),mackynz (07-03-2012),RobNJ (07-03-2012),Ronniex2 (07-16-2018)

  3. #2
    Registered User mackynz's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-19-2012
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    580
    Thanks
    135
    Thanked 173 Times in 115 Posts
    Great info!

  4. #3
    BPnet Senior Member Don's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-03-2007
    Location
    Richmond, Viginia
    Posts
    1,675
    Thanks
    502
    Thanked 841 Times in 542 Posts
    Images: 7
    One of the best and most informative posts I've read in a long time. Thank you!

  5. #4
    BPnet Senior Member DooLittle's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-18-2011
    Location
    In the zoo......
    Posts
    13,027
    Thanks
    8,168
    Thanked 7,347 Times in 4,745 Posts
    Images: 7
    Thanks for the great post

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2
    If nothing ever changed, there would be no butterflies.

  6. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-03-2016
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Yawns more than I think.

    I have an albino ball, and it a a case of mites, that have been taken care of. The person I got him from said he had signs of RI, but the signs had stopped. Now, he has no bubbles out of nose, or no mucus in the mouth, or discharge from any orifice. But he is active after I turn his light off, and the temp is 80- 95 and humidity 60- 90. But it seems if he sleeps a lot and when he yawns is after he gets out of his hide. He does not slither around with his mouth open or shake as he moves. He looks a little under weight, cuz he won't eat yet. And he feels mushy. But wouldn't that be from not eating? I have seen him in his water but he won't lay in it. He will drink, but not lay. Should I be worried. Underneath his mouth, his owner before said it was puffy. But how puffy is puffy? What would puffy come from?? Any thoughts or advice. I know I should take to qualified vet, but I'm trying to see if it's just the last owner that was treating him wrong. Saving money is hard, when vets are so expensive for a 5 minute diagnosis. If anyone has had similar problems, please let me know.

  7. #6
    Telling it like it is! Deborah's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-28-2006
    Posts
    23,192
    Thanks
    5,707
    Thanked 17,477 Times in 8,347 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images: 5

    Re: Yawns more than I think.

    Quote Originally Posted by Coletrainz View Post
    I have an albino ball, and it a a case of mites, that have been taken care of. The person I got him from said he had signs of RI, but the signs had stopped. Now, he has no bubbles out of nose, or no mucus in the mouth, or discharge from any orifice. But he is active after I turn his light off, and the temp is 80- 95 and humidity 60- 90. But it seems if he sleeps a lot and when he yawns is after he gets out of his hide. He does not slither around with his mouth open or shake as he moves. He looks a little under weight, cuz he won't eat yet. And he feels mushy. But wouldn't that be from not eating? I have seen him in his water but he won't lay in it. He will drink, but not lay. Should I be worried. Underneath his mouth, his owner before said it was puffy. But how puffy is puffy? What would puffy come from?? Any thoughts or advice. I know I should take to qualified vet, but I'm trying to see if it's just the last owner that was treating him wrong. Saving money is hard, when vets are so expensive for a 5 minute diagnosis. If anyone has had similar problems, please let me know.
    Instead of posting in a 3 years old thread I would recommend that you create your own thread if you want answers, not everyone re-visit older thread.

    Sent from my SM-T320 using Tapatalk

  8. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-08-2018
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Nidovirus

    Hey all! I'm brand new to the site, and was wondering if anyone could help me out. I had three ball pythons that have since been tested and put down (they were my only snakes) but after enduring 9 months of absolute hell until finding out it was Nidovirus, I'm extremely paranoid. I had a cornsnake and a Crested gecko who were exposed to my male who showed signs after I decided to quarantine. The cornsnake was tested and came back negative, and I was told that I wouldn't need to worry about my crested gecko who has since come into contact with two other crested geckos (not directly but in the same room). Now, I have recently gotten three more ball pythons after it had been roughly a month after my last positive one was removed from my home and I had disinfected everything. I reacquired a young female who I took care of after I took care of my last positive snake, but I wiped my hands and used Lysol after messing with him, so I gave her a 10% chance of having it but I tested her anyways and it came back negative since I was getting two more snakes about a week after her (they're separated and quarantined very hardcore). However, after 9 months of hell, I'm super paranoid. I just want to know if there is a time limit on how long it would take Nidovirus to show up on a test if the little girl is infected (which I highly doubt she is but I'm being super cautious) even though they did a PCR test and it came back negative orally. And I'm very concerned that maybe somehow my Crested gecko got it and could spread it even though he is perfectly healthy, I got him and my last sick male BP (he was adopted but I infected him through inexperience and not knowing what was going on and I take full responsibility for that, I have testing and quarantine protocols now) at the same time, September. So in short, how long does nidovirus take to infect and show up on tests (PCR, I use RAL), and could my Crested gecko have possibly gotten it? And if anyone could tell me how to make a new thread, I cannot for the life of me figure it out. Thank you!!!!!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1