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  1. #1
    BPnet Senior Member Mike Cavanaugh's Avatar
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    The trend of lowering temps.

    I have read on another forum that some folks are lowering their temps on a permanent basis... Claiming that traditional higher temperatures are not optimal. They say their balls are doing better with the lower temps.... Like a constant 80 - 82 degrees without a hot spot?

    Is anybody here familiar with this? I'm not talking about lowering temps for breeding... I am talking about permanently lowering temps
    Last edited by Mike Cavanaugh; 09-25-2011 at 02:16 PM.
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  2. #2
    Sometimes It Hurts... PitOnTheProwl's Avatar
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    One of the guys I know that breeds doesnt use any heat except in our couple of cold months. His snake room is the same temp as our weather outside till we get constant 70 and belows. He hasnt had any problems and his females have been laying anywhere from 5 to 9 egg clutches.

  3. #3
    BPnet Senior Member waltah!'s Avatar
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    I've actually tried it for about a 6 month period in the past. Kept a couple of bp's at around 80-84 room temp without any hot spot. I didn't notice any difference in behavior, eating, shedding or pooping. I don't do it now as I don't like to keep the room temp that high all of the time. It's not something that I would run out and say to do or anything, but I didn't see anything negative happening. Again, it was only a 6 month period so not proven over years.
    I've seen that many people do that with younger Bloods as well.
    Last edited by waltah!; 09-25-2011 at 02:30 PM.
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  4. #4
    BPnet Veteran 2kdime's Avatar
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    If a bigger time breeder does something

    People like to accept it as law

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    Crazy4Herps (09-25-2011)

  6. #5
    BPnet Veteran Homegrownscales's Avatar
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    I agree with that ^
    I'm not about to try to keep mine at constant room temps.


    Check out what's new on my website... www.Homegrownscales.com

  7. #6
    BPnet Senior Member Mike Cavanaugh's Avatar
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    Re: The trend of lowering temps.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2kdime View Post
    If a bigger time breeder does something

    People like to accept it as law
    Explain! Sorry... I am slow
    Mikey Cavanaugh
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  8. #7
    BPnet Veteran 2kdime's Avatar
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    Sending you a PM Mike

  9. #8
    BPnet Veteran Crazy4Herps's Avatar
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    Re: The trend of lowering temps.

    Very interesting! I would imagine it would be okay... I know many classroom pets are kept under optimal temperatures and have no problems digesting, but personally I think that having a gradient is the best way to go, letting the snake choose what temperature it needs.

  10. #9
    BPnet Senior Member Mike Cavanaugh's Avatar
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    Re: The trend of lowering temps.

    Well I guess the nuts and bolts of it are this...

    Some of the larger breeders are using a lower permanent overall temperature to try to get some of those high profile hard to breed morphs We all keep reading about breeding. And I guess while they are doing this they are noticing the snakes as a whole (regardless of morph) doing better at the lower temperatures.
    Last edited by Mike Cavanaugh; 09-25-2011 at 03:10 PM.
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  12. #10
    Telling it like it is! Deborah's Avatar
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    During the winter they are provided with 78 degrees on the cool side (this is achieve with a oil filled heater) and 88 on the warm side (The warm side is 88 during the day and 80 at night since I cool down my breeders)

    During the warmer months (I live in the South) April to September they are kept at 85 with no hot spot, breeders and hatchlings, and yes females have lay their eggs with no hot spot also.

    Because the snake room is a bonus room over the garage it gets hotter than in any other parts of the house. To make it efficient energy wise I chose to work with it rather than fighting it having to run the AC to cool it down to 78 and than having to provide a hot spot.

    Works great that our second year in this house and the snake have adjusted to this without any issue.

    Now would I recommend that to a beginner barely starting out? No I always recommend optimal setting that I know will help a new owner with their animal limiting feeding issues and behavioral problems, once they understand their animal however they should experiment if they feel comfortable enough to do so and find what works for them.

    They can be kept various way what necessary is to find what works for your animals and for yourself.
    Last edited by Deborah; 09-25-2011 at 03:15 PM.

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