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  • 03-12-2008, 04:24 AM
    wannaBballmommy
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    this page has answered many of my questions but i still dont know- whats a *het* and what's the difference between a *het* and a *normal*?
  • 03-12-2008, 06:28 AM
    rabernet
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    A het is a normal appearing snake that carries one copy of the gene needed to make a recessive morph.

    So - a pied (which is recessive) needs two copies of the pied gene to be a visual pied. If a pied is paired with a normal, the resulting offspring all get ONE copy of the pied gene, so they only express themselves as a normal appearing baby, but are 100% het.

    You breed 2 100% hets of the same gene to each other - in this case pied, each egg has a 25% chance of receiving a copy of the gene from both parents, resulting in a visible pied.

    Buy from a reputable breeder when working with hets, since they appear normal.
  • 03-12-2008, 07:39 AM
    Gloryhound
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rabernet View Post
    Buy from a reputable breeder when working with hets, since they appear normal.

    Or at least make sure the breeder has some form of documentation to prove the Het or Possible Het genes exist. Regardless of the method you have to make sure you are comfortable with the deal cause 3 years later when you breed the hets still no gaurantee exists that you will get the homo form. It may take a couple breedings before you finally get the homo form and when you are paying $700+ for a female Het pied that is a lot to swallow for some people when she looks like a normal. :weirdface Regardless of those facts Hets are fun to work with.
  • 03-15-2008, 03:08 PM
    mwedgley
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    my question is, is lavender albino, abino, and caramel albino on the same allele?
  • 10-07-2008, 11:52 AM
    Azriel01
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    Yeah, right now my small group is attempting to bust into the world of Ball Breeding, our big goal for now is to make a killer bee - axanthic, i know how to make killer bee, super pastel x Bumble bee, but then do i just mate the killer with the axanthic over and over till we get a mix?? or is there another path i need to follow to get to the killer axanthic???


    So far we got:
    08' spider
    07' paster M
    00' normal
    soon to own 08' mojave
  • 10-07-2008, 12:01 PM
    dr del
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    Hi,

    I'm sure there will be better recipies posted but here's the cliff notes.

    Since axanthic is recessive both parents would need to carry the gene and, since the killer is a super pastel they would also need to carry the pastel gene.

    So to get the axanthic killer bee you would need to breed something like;

    Bumblebee het axanthic x Pastel het axanthic

    Does that help?


    dr del
  • 10-18-2008, 03:19 PM
    SamuraiZr0
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    This heloped me sooo much !! yay
  • 10-18-2008, 03:41 PM
    spk329
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    Great Lesson Judy.......Thanks
  • 11-28-2008, 05:21 PM
    Norm Grant
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    Hey Judy:

    My question has to do with something I noticed in Barker and Barker on page 63. They show a photo of a BP with an 'S' in the pattern and note that some consider it a genetic marker. Is there anything to this?

    Norm Grant:
  • 11-28-2008, 05:35 PM
    Bill Buchman
    Re: A Lesson in Basic Genetics
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Norm Grant View Post
    Hey Judy:

    My question has to do with something I noticed in Barker and Barker on page 63. They show a photo of a BP with an 'S' in the pattern and note that some consider it a genetic marker. Is there anything to this?

    Norm Grant:

    Most refer to that "S" as a "hook". A significant number of morphs have them, and therefore, they are considered by many ONE of the markers to signal a snake could be genetic. Hope this helps.:)
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