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  1. #1
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    Diatomaceous earth, food grade and reptiles?

    My apartment has bug issues. I know that mammals have less issue with this product, but how about reptiles? Anyone that's a vet that can tell me if it's safe for reptiles too, definitively? Or if I should leave it outside of the cage only? (the bugs like the warmth, the water supply.... and the bedding...)

  2. #2
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    I do not know about reptile but I know it is regularly used with chickens with no ill effects
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  3. #3
    BPnet Senior Member ballpythonluvr's Avatar
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    Re: Diatomaceous earth, food grade and reptiles?

    I had a bug problem when I lived in an apartment and they used diatomaceous earth to control the problem. The problem was in the bedroom where I kept my snakes. Personally, I removed my snakes from the room and had a friend keep them for me until the bugs were eradicated. I did NOT want to take any risks with my snakes. I have no scientific proof that this stuff is dangerous for reptiles but I was not willing to take any risks at all.
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  4. #4
    BPnet Veteran satomi325's Avatar
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    Re: Diatomaceous earth, food grade and reptiles?

    I've used it on my dog when she had some mites on her rear back. It cleared them up within a week.

    The only thing I would be concerned about is the dust. You don't want yourself or your animals breathing that in. Since a snake is very low to the ground, it may be a little more susceptible to breathing it in if you use it in the cage. So to be safe, keep it out of the snake enclosure. If you're afraid of some sort of infestation in the snake cage, use PAM or other reptile mite spray. It works for other creepy crawlies too.


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  5. #5
    Registered User Andys-Python's Avatar
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    Re: Diatomaceous earth, food grade and reptiles?

    Diatomaceous earth is the skeletal remains of diatoms or single celled algae. The skeletons are made of silicon or glass. The way diatomaceous earth works is by cutting open the skeleton or outer covering of an insect and either kills it directly or allows a chemical, that is mixed with the diatomaceous earth, to enter the insect thereby killing it. I would not recommend using this on or near your pets. There are safer methods of caring for your pets (and Im a true believer in better living through chemicals when necessary).
    -Andy

  6. #6
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    As I understand it, the food grade stuff doesn't have chemicals and it's safe for mammals at least to ingest--they put it in food as a preservative, etc (Health nuts like it too). I was a bit concerned about using it in the cage since it's breathing, etc. and reptiles tend to be more sensitive than mammals to such issues. But if someone could guarantee it safe 100%, then I'd like to use it below the current bedding... as no one can, I'll have to use it around and under the cages. (Most of my friends are freaked out by snakes... TT)

    Thanks. If anyone can say positive or negative wither way, I'd like to know. Again, food grade stuff only.
    Last edited by GoldSheep; 04-18-2013 at 12:16 PM.

  7. #7
    BPnet Veteran satomi325's Avatar
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    Re: Diatomaceous earth, food grade and reptiles?

    Quote Originally Posted by Andys-Python View Post
    Diatomaceous earth is the skeletal remains of diatoms or single celled algae. The skeletons are made of silicon or glass. The way diatomaceous earth works is by cutting open the skeleton or outer covering of an insect and either kills it directly :
    This is the exact reason why I used it on my dogs hind end. This was after failed attempts of actual pet grade mite killer. This worked way more effectively.

    But I do agree that it could be potentially hazardous if inhaled.

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  8. #8
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    Let me clarify what I posted earlier.

    People who use it with chickens use it in the chicken bedding and as an additive in dust beds that the chickens scratch/roll in. If it was dangerous to inhale it would be dangerous to the chickens since they are aerosolizing it by scratching/rolling, but they suffer no ill effects. Considering that snakes are not going to be aggressively rolling in it I doubt that they would be able to aerosolize it at all so the odds of them inhaling quantities larger than what chickens breath in are slim, plus the added humidity levels of our tubs are going to keep aerosolization down as well.

    I do not see any reason to suspect it would be harmful
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  9. The Following User Says Thank You to asplundii For This Useful Post:

    GoldSheep (04-24-2013)

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